Wharton School

How states can help police mortgage-lending practices

Wharton’s Brian Feinstein discusses his research on how judicial foreclosure can help states fill the policy gap left by the federal government’s pullback from regulatory enforcement of mortgage-lending.

Penn Today Staff

Regulating big tech

Wharton’s Eric K. Clemons discusses the pros and cons of boosting regulations on big technology companies such as Facebook, Amazon, Google, and Apple, after years of being penalized in Europe for anticompetitive practices. 

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Two-day shipping or 113 years of experience? How an Italian Market kitchen shop plans to outwit Amazon.

Barbara Kahn of the Wharton School discussed a retail business in Philadelphia’s Italian Market. “They are really operating on a good in-store customer experience that can’t be duplicated online. That is one of the ways to compete in today’s world,” she said.

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The New York Times

Nike drops ‘Betsy Ross flag’ sneaker after Kaepernick criticizes it

Americus Reed of the Wharton School explained the backlash against a Nike sneaker that features the 13-star Betsy Ross flag. “For lots of people, it’s quite similar to, say, the Confederate flag,” he said. “The revolution now is one of diversity, of all kinds of dimensions that go beyond just white males — women, people of color, people of different sexual orientations. It’s a different world, and it’s a different flag.”

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Marketplace (NPR)

Big drugstore beauty brands grapple with competition and savvy consumers

Americus Reed of the Wharton School said there’s a new onslaught of niche beauty products in mainstream retail outlets. Many of the brands “are meant for different types of skin so there’s a diversity and inclusion kind of component,” he said.

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Bloomberg

Trump will lose in 2020 if he doesn’t ‘keep the market humming,’ Siegel says

Jeremy Siegel of the Wharton School said “the biggest mistake that most investors make is reacting to all the blogs and tweets and twists and turns of the market.”

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The New York Times

When controversies hit, wait-and-see no longer works, U.S. companies find

Witold Henisz of the Wharton School said waiting for companies to tell consumers about investments into the public good “doesn’t work anymore,” due to younger generations’ easy access to information. Millennials are not only well-informed but “willing to take lower wages if they feel like a company has a strong social purpose,” he said.

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