Political Science

Rogers Smith on the heart and soul of America

As a scholar, the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science is perhaps best known for challenging the view that the U.S. is fundamentally, “in its heart and soul,” a liberal democracy.

From Omnia

Engaging in the election

In a collaborative English course taught by Lorene Cary in the fall, students shared their experiences with civic engagement by writing for publication, partnering with nonprofits like Vote That Jawn to share non-partisan information with other young first-time voters.

Louisa Shepard

Science, politics, and vaccine acceptance

As the COVID-19 vaccine is being distributed across the country, new research out of the Department of Philosophy shows that knowledge about the nature of science can combat political biases.

From Omnia

Inside election night 2020

During a virtual panel, Penn students, faculty, and staff who worked on NBC’s Decision Desk on Election night gave a behind-the-scenes look at the high-pressure night

Kristen de Groot



Media Contact


Experts



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Our democracy remains intact, thanks to our courts, free press, and right to assembly

Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center wrote an op-ed about the durability of democracy in the U.S. amid polarization, disinformation, and other obstacles. “Individuals exercised constitutional freedoms, especially the mutually reinforcing ones of speech, press, petition, peaceable assembly, and the opportunity to vote—to bend the arc of the country’s history toward justice,” she wrote.

FULL STORY →



Philadelphia Inquirer

Does Twitter’s ban violate Trump’s free-speech rights? Likely not, but it raises questions about social media platforms, Philly experts say

Diana Mutz of the Annenberg School for Communication and School of Arts & Sciences said social media hasn’t enriched the quality of elected leaders’ communication with the public. “What gains traction on social media is outrageousness,” she said. “It incentivizes precisely what we don’t want in political discourse.”

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

Confederate battle flag an unnerving sight in Capitol

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts & Sciences commented on the use of the Confederate flag during the breach of the U.S. Capitol. “To see it flaunted right in front of your face, in the United States Capitol, the heart of the government, was simply outrageous,” she said.

FULL STORY →



NBC News

Joe Biden could send a message to Black Americans with this reparations bill

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts & Sciences said President-elect Joe Biden should support a bill that will create a commission to explore giving reparations to the Black American descendants of enslaved Africans. “Given the role that Black people played in the election, getting him nominated and saving his campaign—there’s no reason they shouldn’t support this bill,” said Berry. “This is one of the best ways to make good on their promise to attack systemic racism and white supremacy and elevate the economic and social condition of Black people.”

FULL STORY →



WHYY (Philadelphia)

Congress expected to certify Biden’s win this week—despite GOP push to subvert the vote

Kermit Roosevelt of the Law School attributed efforts to call into question the results of the presidential election to longer term political objectives. “I’m afraid that it’s going to make the next four years a lot more difficult—not that they were going to be easy, anyway,” he said. “To the extent that we’re in an era of people living in different realities, this exacerbates that.”

FULL STORY →



Associated Press

8 Pa. House GOP members to oppose Biden’s electoral votes

Seth Kreimer of the Law School spoke about challenges to the results of the 2020 presidential election. “I have taught constitutional law for almost four decades, and I do not believe I have ever before seen American officials reject the outcome of an election with such brazenness,” he said.

FULL STORY →