Political Science

In These Times: Race and repair

OMNIA’s final episodes look into how institutions have perpetuated racial hierarchies, how the past reverberates through the present, and consider what justice looks like.

From OMNIA



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In the News


CNN

Arrest of a Trump friend sends key message

Claire Finkelstein of the Law School co-authored an opinion piece about the prosecution of Tom Barrack, chair of Donald J. Trump’s 2017 inaugural committee. Barrack has been charged with several crimes, including conspiracy to act as an unregistered agent of a foreign government. “The prosecution is a welcome first step to rein in both foreign lobbying generally and the corruption seemingly surrounding the former president specifically, but much more is needed on both counts,” they wrote.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

To honor John Lewis, we must turn back the rising tide of voter suppression

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts & Sciences wrote about the resurgence of voter suppression laws in the U.S. To preserve the right to vote, Berry said, “We must pass the For the People Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Act. And to do that, we must remove the Senate filibuster as a barrier to the legislation.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

The political rhetoric over Pa. Republicans’ election bill obscures the truth: It’s complicated

Dan Hopkins of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about the unpredictable effects of changes to the election code. “It’s the question of unintended consequences, in part, and the interactions between these different kinds of provisions,” he said. “These policies can be hard to evaluate, because people may react to them in unexpected ways.”

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The New York Times

How far are Republicans willing to go? They’re already gone

Daniel Hopkins of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about the lack of public understanding of U.S. election law. “Relatively few people are equipped to directly evaluate claims that an election was fraudulent, so voters necessarily rely on politicians, media commentators and other elites to tell them if something ran afoul,” he said.

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The Washington Post

An Islamist party is part of Israel’s new coalition government. How did that happen?

Guy Grossman of the School of Arts & Sciences and a Hebrew University of Jerusalem colleague wrote about Israel’s 36th government, which is expected to include an Arab party for the first time in more than 40 years. “The breaking of the long-standing taboo could see Arab parties continuing to be legitimate coalition partners,” they said.

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The New York Times

How the storming of the Capitol became a ‘normal tourist visit’

Research by Yphtach Lelkes of the Annenberg School for Communication and Cory Clark of the School of Arts & Sciences was cited in an opinion piece about partisanship and democracy.

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