School of Nursing

Predicting post-injury depression and PTSD risk

Up to half of all acute injury patients experience post-traumatic stress disorder in the months after injury. For urban black men, some of whom have experienced prior trauma, childhood adversity, and neighborhood disadvantage, acute post-injury stress responses are exacerbated.

Penn Today Staff

Full circle

Jennifer Toth was treated for hepatoblastoma as a young child at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where she returned to work as an oncology nurse following her graduation from Penn Nursing in 2015.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


WHYY (Philadelphia)

How to keep teen drivers’ eyes on the road, and their fingers off the keyboard

Kate McDonald of the School of Nursing discussed efforts to reduce teen car crashes, including in-school training. “What we’ve seen to be successful in getting people to use seat belts, or reducing cigarette use, we want to be able to shift that over to reducing distracted driving and changing the social norms around what’s acceptable and what’s not,” she said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Nearly half of men hospitalized with physical injuries develop depression or PTSD, study suggests

A new study from the School of Nursing has found that while nearly half of black men treated for injuries in Philadelphia hospitals develop depression or PTSD after being discharged, only 7% of trauma centers screen patients for mental illness. Co-author Therese Richmond said, “we must integrate psychological care into the very essence of trauma care if we are to improve outcomes from serious injuries.”

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Al Día

Our Nurses: the best-kept secret in Medicine today

Dean Antonia Villarruel of the School of Nursing was highlighted as an “enlightened woman who worked the hardest to give fair recognition to the many women and men of Hispanic origin anxious to make a contribution to the quality of American health care through their yet to be valued profession of nursing.”

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Nature

Breastfeeding mums are finally getting spaces to pump at some U.S. institutions

Diane Spatz of the School of Nursing discussed her research about on-campus lactation spaces. “The research is indisputable that breastfeeding improves the lives of individual mothers and infants and results in overall better societal outcomes,” said Spatz.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Anti-vaccine parents are often white, college-educated, ‘Whole Foods moms’

The School of Nursing’s Alison Buttenheim and Janet Chrzan as well as Lindsay Glassman, a doctoral candidate in the School of Arts and Sciences, commented on anti-vaccine beliefs.

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