School of Veterinary Medicine

A Penn Vet tale: Olive, the tiny little fighter

When Olive, the four-month-old Shih Tzu mix, became critically ill with respiratory distress, clinicians at Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital spent a week collaborating on intensive treatment.

Sacha Adorno

A heart start for Milkshake, the fainting goat

When Milkshake’s vitals were dangerously compromised, a team at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center pinpointed the problem in the fainting goat’s heart, and saved her life.

From Penn Vet

Correcting night blindness in dogs

Researchers in the School of Veterinary Medicine and colleagues have developed a gene therapy that restores dim-light vision in dogs with a congenital form of night blindness, offering hope for treating a similar condition in people.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Humans are back to work and social events. Their pups are getting anxious

Carlo Siracusa of the School of Veterinary Medicine gives tips on at-home behavior work to do with dogs who are anxious.

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The New York Times

Chewed and rolled: How cats make the most of their catnip high

Carlo Siracusa of the School of Veterinary Medicine comments on how evidence shows that some cats want to impregnate their body with the smell of catnip but a sizable chunk of cats don’t show this behavior.

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Smithsonian Magazine

Dogs sniff out COVID-19 with surprising accuracy

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine is quoted on the levels of difficulty for dogs to smell COVID in sweat samples compared to on a full human body.

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New Scientist

Rat testicle cells make sperm after being frozen for 23 years

Postdoctoral fellow Eoin Whelan of the School of Veterinary Medicine comments on testicle tissue frozen before cancer treatment that may allow young male cancer victims to later father biological children through in vitro fertilization.

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The New York Times

They’re all good dogs, and it has nothing to do with their breed

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine comments that there are some big picture behavioral traits more common in some dog breeds than others, but the individual variation is high within a breed.

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