Communications

What makes us share posts on social media?

A new Annenberg School of Communication study reveals that we share the social media posts that we think are the most relevant to ourselves or to our friends and family.

From Annenberg School for Communication

Cable news networks have grown more polarized

An Annenberg School for Communication analysis of 10 years of cable TV news reveals a growing partisan gap as networks like Fox and MSNBC have shifted to the right or the left of the political spectrum.

From Annenberg School for Communication



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In the News


The Guardian

Biden’s claim that COVID pandemic is over sparks debate over future

PIK Professor Ezekiel Emanuel says that President Biden’s remarks reflect the general population’s current disregard of masks and pandemic precautions.

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ABC Australia

World Heritage—too much of a good thing?

PIK Professor Lynn Meskell, also of the Penn Museum, joins a radio conversation to discuss how the World Heritage Convention has become a victim of its own success.

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SiriusXM

Americans’ civic expertise is apparently not that great

On an episode of “The Smerconish Podcast,” Kathleen Hall Jamieson discusses the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s new study on declining civics knowledge.

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USA Today

Up for debate? Midterm candidates dispute rules and dodge debates in a new campaign normal

Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center explains why political candidates are questioning the effectiveness of debates.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Vaping habits differ by race and sexual orientation among teens, study finds

A study by Andy Tan of the Annenberg School for Communication and colleagues finds that vaping habits vary among teens based on race, sexual orientation, and the intersection of those two identities.

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USA Today

Livestreamed violence compounds America’s horror and inspires copycats, experts say. When will it stop?

PIK Professor Desmond Upton Patton says that the digital trail of evidence left by violent criminals needs study, resources, and intervention to avoid exacerbating community trauma and damaging mental health, especially for people of color.

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