Perelman School of Medicine

CAR T cell therapy leads to lasting remissions

In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor CAR T cell therapy Kymriah® led to long-lasting remissions in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

Penn Today Staff

Why we have hair here, but not there

A new study answers a fundamental question in human evolution about how and where hair grows on the body, and reveals the existence of a naturally-occurring inhibitor to hair growth.

Penn Today Staff

The Power of Penn in London

In London, President Amy Gutmann presented the vision for the University’s $4.1 billion campaign, The Power of Penn.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Smithsonian Magazine

Why did humans lose their fur?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Sarah Millar discussed human hair growth patterns. Millar said, of a recently discovered inhibitor protein, “Dkk2 is enough to prevent hair from growing but not to get rid of all control mechanisms. There’s a lot more to look at.”

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Science

What now for human genome editing?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s James Wilson discussed possible venues for the scientific oversight of controversial research. The FDA could be a good option, he suggested, but the organization would have to change its confidentiality restrictions to supervise effectively.

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Reader’s Digest

The 10 most common types of cancer in the United States

Thomas Karasic of the Perelman School of Medicine weighed in on treatments for liver and pancreatic cancers.

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Today

Died of a broken heart? The science behind close couple deaths

David Casarett of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the phenomenon of spouses dying shortly after one another. Casarett said social and cultural factors may play a role, as in cases when “the surviving spouses stop taking care of themselves. Sometimes they become depressed.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Black and Hispanic Americans have a harder time quitting cigarettes. Will this Penn study find a way to help?

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, led by Scott Halpern, are exploring better ways to support smoking cessation in black and Latino populations. “We’re confident that if we succeed in producing this evidence, health systems and payers will respond,” Halpern said.

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