Perelman School of Medicine

Navigating cytokine storms

Pairing their expertise, Nilam Mangalmurti of the Perelman School of Medicine and Christopher Hunter of the School of Veterinary Medicine have been working to understand the protective and harmful aspects of the immune response, including in COVID-19.

Katherine Unger Baillie

The overlooked effects of fireworks

For veterans living with post-traumatic stress disorder, fireworks and loud pyrotechnics can add stress and trigger physical reactions, as they mimic the stimuli of combat.

From Penn Medicine News



In the News


The New York Times

Who gets a vaccine first? U.S. considers race in coronavirus plans

Harald Schmidt of the Perelman School of Medicine said courts would likely strike down any vaccine prioritization model based on race and ethnicity, proposing instead an approach that considers socioeconomic status. “It’s imperative that we pay attention to how COVID has impacted the health of minorities differently; otherwise it compounds the inequalities we’ve seen,” he said.

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NBC News

How blood type may affect your coronavirus risk

Lewis Kaplan of the Perelman School of Medicine said people with a lower risk of contracting COVID-19 according to their blood type shouldn’t get overly confident. "It might mean they have less risk, but if you engage in risky behavior, we don't know just how much risk you need to incur to overwhelm whatever potential protection you might have," he said. "We have no clue."

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The New York Times

The wilderness of rare genetic diseases and the parents navigating it

Jim Wilson of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about his research at Penn’s Orphan Disease Center. “When I was practicing clinical genetics, it was limited to diagnosis and prognosis,” he said. “Now, in a limited number of diseases, there are potential treatments, if not cures.”

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BBC News

Coronavirus: Wear masks in crowded public spaces, says science body

Paul Edelstein of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the effectiveness of face masks in preventing the spread of COVID-19. "There are people without symptoms going about their daily business who are unknowingly breathing out droplets that are carrying the virus," he said. "If they had their faces covered the majority of those droplets would be caught before they can infect other people. Wearing face coverings can help save lives and prevent disabling illnesses."

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NPR

End-of-life planning is a ‘lifetime gift’ to your loved ones

Pallavi Kumar of the Perelman School of Medicine said the most important medical decision one can make is assigning a medical proxy as part of an advance directive. "Think about the person in your life who understands you, your goals, your values, your priorities and then is able to set aside their own wishes and be a voice for you," she said.

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