Perelman School of Medicine

Electronic research notebooks streamline the scientific method

To do it right, scientific research requires careful record keeping, dutiful repetition of protocols, and, in many cases, free exchange of data. Electronic research notebooks are intended to help researchers up their game and are now available at no charge to the University community through the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Dawn Bonnell.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


CNBC

Dieting is out. That poses a problem for a company named Weight Watchers as it rebrands itself WW

Kevin Volpp of the Wharton School and Perelman School of Medicine offered commentary on the “universal challenge” of dieting. “People generally speaking are much more successful in achieving initial weight loss than maintaining weight loss,” he said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Depression often goes undiagnosed. Researchers are turning to Facebook to change that

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine co-authored a study on social media and mental illness. “Depression is a really debilitating disease and we have treatments that can help people,” said Raina Merchant. “We want to think of new ways to get people resources and identification for depression earlier.”

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Smithsonian Magazine

Scientists break the rules of reproduction by breeding mice from single-sex parents

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Marisa Bartolomei offered commentary on same-sex reproductive experiments, which have proven easier in bimaternal than bipaternal pairings.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Brown fat could help fight obesity. This Penn scientist is looking to harness its power

Patrick Seale of the Perelman School of Medicine discussed differing types of human fat: “white fat,” which stores energy, and “brown fat,” which burns it. Seale was recently awarded the Richard E. Weitzman Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award for his research on the subject.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Is blackout drinking the same as passing out from alcohol? A Penn psychologist explains

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Reagan Wetherill discussed common misconceptions about alcohol-related blackouts. People in a blackout are “conscious and interacting with their environment,” she said. But their brains are “not creating memories” due to alcohol’s impact on the hippocampus.

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