Perelman School of Medicine

Geographic disparities in lower extremity amputation rates

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association shows that peripheral artery disease affects Black people and those of low socioeconomic status, and the U.S. health system is missing opportunities to slow or stop the progression.

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In the News


Scientific American

Four success stories in gene therapy

Jean Bennett and Albert Maguire of the Perelman School of Medicine developed a gene therapy to treat blindness in patients with retinal dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPE65 gene. “These people can now do things they never could have dreamed of doing, and they’re more independent and enjoying life,” said Bennett.

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ABC News

Why breakthrough COVID deaths can be misunderstood

Edward Stadtmauer of the Perelman School of Medicine advised cancer patients to get vaccinated against COVID-19. “If you have abnormal plasma cells to begin with or are getting therapy that might suppress or damage plasma cells, you can see why that this group of patients may have the most difficulty responding to a COVID infection and responding to vaccines,” he said. “If there is any group of patients who should be vaccinated and get a booster, it is this group of patients.”

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ABC News

Why COVID boosters weren't tweaked to better match variants

John Wherry of the Perelman School of Medicine said there’s no guarantee that a booster shot retooled to target the delta variant would work better than a general COVID-19 vaccine booster.

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Fortune

Same vaccines, but different fatality rates: Why are some COVID outbreaks worse than others?

John Wherry of the Perelman School of Medicine said, “We’ve learned more in the last year and a half about human immunology and human vaccine responses than we probably learned in the previous several decades.”

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MSNBC

The Beat with Ari Melber

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine discussed the pandemic’s toll on mental health. Rather than forcing a confident, upbeat exterior to appease others, Gallagher recommends “being real and authentic, and talking about the struggles that you are having.”

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