Athletics

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Sports talk with M. Grace Calhoun

The director of athletics and recreation discusses the Red & Blue’s recent sports successes, making progress toward the department’s strategic goals, the funding of college athletics, and the 125th running of the Penn Relays.

Greg Johnson

How a year in space affects the brain

Penn Medicine’s Mathias Basner discusses the NASA Twins Study, which analyzed astronaut Scott Kelly’s physical and mental health after he spent 340 days in space, and found that Kelly’s performance on a cognitive test battery dropped when he returned to Earth for six months.

Michele W. Berger

Inside Penn

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Trump-friendly Newsmax bundled into Comcast’s Xfinity service

The Annenberg School for Communication’s Victor Pickard discussed conservative news channel Newsmax and its recent deal with Comcast. If Comcast is “feeling the heat from the right, it will make sense to appease some of those critics,” said Pickard.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Penn’s female rowers have a new teammate. She’s 10.

The Penn women’s rowing team has “adopted” 10-year-old Keira McGrenehan, a chronically ill CHOP patient, as a part of the Team IMPACT program. “We’ve been so excited to have her with us, so we can know her and understand her difficulties and victories,” says junior Romy Simpson, one of the team’s captains.

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Time

Why spicy food makes your nose run—and why it’s great for you

Paul Rozin of the School of Arts and Sciences explained why we enjoy eating spicy food, a kind of “benign masochism.” “People seem to enjoy pushing the limits of what we can take,” he said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Penn’s female rowers have a new teammate. She’s 10.

With the help of Penn’s women’s rowing team, the sport is bringing Keira McGrenehan joy and relief as she manages ulcerative colitis through a national program called Team IMPACT, which connects kids with serious and chronic illnesses to college athletic teams.

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Vox.com

Native American activists: The fire at Notre Dame is devastating. So is the destruction of our sacred lands

Sally Gordon of the Law School and the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about the history behind the lack of protections for indigenous people’s sacred lands in the U.S. “The process of eliminating native power and consigning native Americans primarily to reservations meant the appropriation, through treaty or otherwise, of so many millions of acres.”

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The Washington Post

A smarter way to think about willpower

Angela Duckworth of the School of Arts and Sciences and Katherine Milkman of the Wharton School are among co-authors of an op-ed about self-control. While many believe Americans’ willpower is on the decline, the authors write, “the scant scientific evidence on the question suggests that if anything, the capacity to delay gratification may be increasing.”

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The New York Times

‘Partly alive’: Scientists revive cells in brains from dead pigs

PIK Professor Jonathan Moreno weighed in on an experiment that revived tissue in the brains of dead pigs. “If ever there was an issue that merited big public deliberation on the ethics of science and medicine, this is one.”

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NPR

First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as human gene-editing trials get underway

A clinical trial led by Edward Stadtmauer of the Perelman School of Medicine will be using CRISPR to treat cancer patients.

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Associated Press

Senior’s weakness for scams may be warning sign of dementia

Jason Karlawish of the Perelman School of Medicine said a recent study on aging and scam awareness doesn’t prove a link between susceptibility and cognitive decline in seniors. However, Karlawish says, the results “should be a call to action to health care systems, the financial services industry and their regulators.”

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NPR

What can a personality test tell us about who we are?

Adam Grant of the Wharton School spoke about his concerns with the Myers-Briggs test, when used by companies to make staffing decisions. “It’s a great way to weed out diversity,” Grant said.

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