The Latest

A food journey across the Middle East

During a summer internship with Professor Heather J. Sharkey, four undergrads studied oranges, olive oil, coffee, and sorghum in an effort to understand their political, nutritional, and emotional value to the region.

Michele W. Berger

Inside Penn

More From Inside Penn →

Multimedia

Penn in the NewsSee all →

Fast Company

UPenn releases surprising report on 9/11 rescue dogs and their causes of death

Research from the School of Veterinary Medicine tracked the causes of death for 95 search-and-rescue dogs deployed on 9/11 and showed that most of the dogs died of typical age-related conditions and outlived others of their breeds. “Dogs have a really good filtering system,” said Cynthia Otto. “Their lungs are different—they don’t get asthma, for example.”

FULL STORY →

NBC News

Secret, powerful panels will pick COVID-19 vaccine winners

Susan Ellenberg of the Perelman School of Medicine said it’s important to keep data and safety monitoring boards anonymous to protect the members from people desperate for treatment. It “would be very hard to tell [a patient], ‘Oh I can’t help you.’ It’s an unreasonable burden,” she said.

FULL STORY →

Marketplace (NPR)

AI is reshaping the way we buy, sell and value homes

Christopher Geczy of the Wharton School was interviewed about digital advancements in real estate. “The advent of computer technology, especially with respect to artificial intelligence—computer vision—is that it can compare what it sees to hundreds of thousands of other examples for reference points,” he said. “The scale of the intelligence can potentially add where humans can potentially lack.”

FULL STORY →

Associated Press

Mars drops Uncle Ben’s, reveals new name for rice brand

Americus Reed II of the Wharton School spoke about the recent Uncle Ben’s rice rebrand and efforts to redefine who “Ben” is. “You don’t want to step in it twice,” Reed said. “I think what you might see is a very watered-down, safe creativity. Let’s not step on anyone’s toes. You’ll see that for a while.”

FULL STORY →

Bloomberg

Stay-at-home orders more effective on virus than closing businesses

Research by the Wharton School’s Kent Smetters, Alexander Arnon, and John Ricco found that shelter-in-place orders did more to combat the coronavirus than business closures and at a lower economic cost.

FULL STORY →

Business Insider

4 big questions you may have about college admissions during the pandemic, answered by an Ivy League dean and a former NYT education writer

Dean of Admissions Eric Furda and Jacques Steinberg, co-authors of “The College Conversation,” shared an excerpt from their guide to navigating college admissions and freshman year amid the pandemic.

FULL STORY →

The Wall Street Journal

Thousands of American troops to take part in COVID-19 early-detection study

PIK Professor Jonathan Moreno commented on plans to conduct a COVID-19 early-detection study on U.S. troops. “Should we ask for consent if it reveals medical issues that a person in uniform may not want revealed and is not relevant to job performance?” he asked.

FULL STORY →

Philadelphia Inquirer

They Shazamed songs blasting from cars on Philly’s Girard Avenue and created a ‘Girard Jams’ playlist on Spotify

Guthrie Ramsey of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about two Philadelphians who compiled a playlist of songs played from cars passing by their apartment. “If we all listen to playlists created in that manner for us, you might get a different understanding about the world surrounding you,” he said.

FULL STORY →

The Washington Post

FDA poised to announce tougher standards for a COVID-19 vaccine that make it unlikely one will be cleared by Election Day

Holly Fernandez Lynch of the Perelman School of Medicine commented on the FDA’s use of emergency authorizations to expedite coronavirus drugs. “Is the president going to put the screws to the FDA so much that they will speed ahead on a vaccine?” she asked.

FULL STORY →

CNBC

$300 unemployment benefits end in at least 9 states as stimulus hopes fade

Ioana Marinescu of the School of Social Policy & Practice spoke about the absence of a second stimulus detail and its impact on unemployed Americans. “This is going to be hardest on more disadvantaged, lower-income individuals and communities of color because they’ve been disproportionately impacted by job loss,” she said. “Also, a dollar means more to a poor person than a rich person. Losing those precious dollars is really a meaningful loss for those people.”

FULL STORY →