The Latest

Navigating cytokine storms

Pairing their expertise, Nilam Mangalmurti of the Perelman School of Medicine and Christopher Hunter of the School of Veterinary Medicine have been working to understand the protective and harmful aspects of the immune response, including in COVID-19.

Katherine Unger Baillie

Bats and COVID

A new study from Penn Vet's New Bolton Center tests the guano of North American bats currently in Pennsylvania wildlife rehabilitation centers for the presence of COVID-19.

Kristina García

Children’s literature as ‘seed work’

Penn GSE’s Ebony Elizabeth Thomas discusses the importance of more diverse books for kids and the challenges that continue to stifle early anti-racist learning. She also shares a curated list of recommended books for youth catered to this particular moment.

Lauren Hertzler

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The New York Times

Who gets a vaccine first? U.S. considers race in coronavirus plans

Harald Schmidt of the Perelman School of Medicine said courts would likely strike down any vaccine prioritization model based on race and ethnicity, proposing instead an approach that considers socioeconomic status. “It’s imperative that we pay attention to how COVID has impacted the health of minorities differently; otherwise it compounds the inequalities we’ve seen,” he said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Penn football coach Ray Priore talks about no fall season, hope for spring

Penn football coach Ray Priore was game planning up until this past Monday, hoping his team might play this fall. Then the announcement came Wednesday: no sports in the Ivy League this fall semester. Now Priore is balancing his optimism with an understanding of the obstacles the pandemic brings to his sport.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Antifa rumors and hoaxes have stoked real fear in Philadelphia neighborhoods

Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center says the meaning of “antifa" is being constructed in real time via public discourse. “When you use the word antifa, you’re creating the sense that it actually does exist, normalizing the language of ‘antifa,’ without knowing what the reference is,” she said. “It is becoming a ‘devil term’ on the right—a term that is used to encapsulate everything you’re afraid of.”

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Bloomberg

Wharton’s Siegel sees inflation return, strong consumer spending in 2021

Jeremy Siegel of the Wharton School said 2020’s pandemic will lead to strong consumer spending in 2021. “This money in people’s accounts is going to be spent,” he said.

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Axios

Fighting the coronavirus infodemic

Alison Buttenheim of the School of Nursing spoke about the spread of misinformation online. "In our hyper-polarized and politicized climate, many folks just inherently mistrust advice or evidence that comes from an opposing political party," she said.

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The New York Times

How could human nature have become this politicized?

Research about political polarization in the U.S. by Yphtach Lelkes of the Annenberg School for Communication, Matthew Levendusky of the School of Arts & Sciences, and colleagues at Stanford University was cited.

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Wired

America has a sick obsession with COVID-19 polls

Damon Centola of the Annenberg School for Communication said people are sensitive to social cues about health-related behaviors, like mask wearing. “It’s so conspicuous because it’s new, and it’s shifting underneath our feet,” he said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Ivy League won’t have any fall semester sports

Athletics Director M. Grace Calhoun, who also serves as chair of the Ivy League’s committee on administration, commented on the League’s recently announced policies for fall semester sports. “The only way this really works is if everyone works together,” she said.

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The New York Times

The wilderness of rare genetic diseases and the parents navigating it

Jim Wilson of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about his research at Penn’s Orphan Disease Center. “When I was practicing clinical genetics, it was limited to diagnosis and prognosis,” he said. “Now, in a limited number of diseases, there are potential treatments, if not cures.”

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BBC News

Coronavirus: Wear masks in crowded public spaces, says science body

Paul Edelstein of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the effectiveness of face masks in preventing the spread of COVID-19. "There are people without symptoms going about their daily business who are unknowingly breathing out droplets that are carrying the virus," he said. "If they had their faces covered the majority of those droplets would be caught before they can infect other people. Wearing face coverings can help save lives and prevent disabling illnesses."

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