Graduate School of Education

The beauty of the two-wheeled commute

On Bike to Work Day, Penn will fete two-wheeled commuters with snacks, showers, and swag. For many at the University, commuting by bike is a way of life. Five Penn staff and faculty share how they make it work and why they keep riding.

Katherine Unger Baillie

The future of learning is digital

Penn GSE’s Yasmin Kafai, a learning scientist who has designed tools and communities to promote coding, crafting, and creativity, believes we need to change how we think about teaching and learning, while making sure every child has a chance to develop these vital skills.

Penn Today Staff

The best books of 2018 for young readers

Penn GSE’s Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and her team share their book choices for elementary and middle grade kids, showcasing authors whose work explores issues like race, gender, ethnicity, and class thoughtfully and empathetically.

Penn Today Staff

Staging the plague

Eighty-one students training in a diversity of health professions worked with regional and federal agencies to confront an imagined outbreak scenario centered around bubonic plague in Philadelphia.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


The Economist

What budget cuts during the Great Recession did to pupils’ test scores

A study co-authored by Matthew Steinberg of the Graduate School of Education was cited in an article about the effects of budget cuts on test scores in poor and minority school districts.

FULL STORY →



NPR

Kalamazoo Promise reaches a milestone, and faces a challenge

Laura Perna of the Graduate School of Education weighed in on programs like The Kalamazoo Promise, which guarantees college scholarships to public high school students. “We should be asking questions about whether the benefit is going to people who would have gone to college anyhow, even without the award,” she said. “We should also be asking questions about the extent to which the students who are getting the award have enough of the supports to actually complete whatever educational program they start.”

FULL STORY →



Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Number problem moves Morehouse professor: too few black math teachers

Richard Ingersoll of the Graduate School of Education and the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about an overrepresentation of women in the teaching profession, as well as high turnover rates for teachers of color. “It’s not about the person,” said Ingersoll. “It has to do with the schools.”

FULL STORY →



Education Week

Ed-tech supporters promise innovations that can transform schools. Teachers not seeing impact

Barbara “Bobbi” Kurshan of the Graduate School of Education said K-12 schools often lack a crucial ingredient for innovation: “a culture of productive failure.”

FULL STORY →



Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Expert: Retention strategies could help teacher shortage

Richard Ingersoll of the Graduate School of Education and School of Arts and Sciences said the majority of teachers who leave the profession do so because of the working conditions. “It’s not about the person,” he says. “It has to do with the schools.”

FULL STORY →