Graduate School of Education

How teachers can talk about violence at the Capitol

Sigal Ben-Porath outlines a strategy for discussing the historic events with students according to grade and knowledge levels, focusing on the facts of what happened and why it matters.

From Penn GSE

Howard Stevenson on creating change through racial literacy

In the wake of the series of police killings of Black people that sparked historic protests and heightened national conversation about race, and amid persistent structures of systemic racism, how can people of color promote their own emotional well-being and healing? How can leaders and organizations create lasting change to advance anti-racism and social justice?

From Penn GSE

The best books for young readers of 2020

The sixth annual list of books, chosen by Penn GSE’s Humanizing Stories team, highlights stories of love, joy, loss, strength, and resilience.

From Penn GSE



In the News


The New York Times

Dr. Seuss books are pulled, and a ‘cancel culture’ controversy erupts

Ebony Elizabeth Thomas of the Graduate School of Education spoke about perceptions of the Seuss estate’s decision to stop selling books with racist imagery. “Folks are not remembering the text itself; they are remembering the affective experiences they had around those texts,” said Thomas. “White children or parents might not have noticed the offensive anti-Asian stereotyping in ‘Mulberry Street.’ I certainly didn’t.”

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NBC News

The reckoning with Dr. Seuss’ racist imagery has been years in the making

Ebony Elizabeth Thomas of the Graduate School of Education spoke about a decision by Dr. Seuss Enterprises to stop publishing six of the late author’s books which contain racist imagery. “We know now that there are anti-Asian stereotypes in ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.’ ‘The Cat in the Hat’ is minstrelsy,’” she said. “When we know better, we can do better.”

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NBC News

Schools face a substitute teacher crisis. These districts are getting creative to fix it

Richard Ingersoll of the Graduate School of Education and the School of Arts & Sciences commented on how some states and school districts have lessened requirements for substitute teachers in order to meet demand. "When there's difficulty filling classrooms, often the reaction is let's lower the bar, let's widen the gate," he said. "That's disastrous to do that. Basically, you're sacrificing qualifications because you think it's an emergency."

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Philadelphia Inquirer

This Penn student writes YA novels with her sister. Their new book is ‘close to perfection,’ Kirkus says

Graduate School of Education doctoral student Maritza Moulite and her sister, a doctoral student at Howard University, have written a new young-adult novel about racial injustice.

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WHYY (Philadelphia)

Early data shows hopeful signs for pandemic learning in Philly, but huge questions remain

Michael Gottfried of the Graduate School of Education said it’s difficult to quantify how school is going for students amid the pandemic. “We’re sort of building the plane as we fly it,” he said. “Everything’s up in the air now. Everything’s been disrupted just from the measurement side.”

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