Health Sciences

From preserving mummies to practicing medicine

Physician-in-training Charlotte Tisch draws on her background in archaeological artifacts for her medical training, even reaching out to museums for PPE during the pandemic.

From Penn Medicine News

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents

More than 90% of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals.

By Penn Nursing News

Home health care improves COVID-19 outcomes

Survivors of COVID-19 often have health ramifications from their illness and hospital stay, and until now, no data has been available on the outcomes of COVID-19 patients discharged home after hospitalization and their recovery needs.

By Penn Nursing News



In the News


Health.com

What is trypanophobia? How to cope with a fear of needles so you can get the COVID-19 vaccine

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine offered tips for overcoming fear of needles in order to get the COVID-19 vaccine, starting with just making the appointment. "More doing and less thinking is an important way to overcome your fear," she said.

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The New York Times

Why are we so afraid of fevers?

Paul Offit of the Perelman School of Medicine said treating fevers can prolong or worsen an illness because immunity works better at higher temperatures. While fever reducers can relieve uncomfortable symptoms, “You’re not supposed to feel better,” he said. “You’re supposed to stay under the covers, keep warm, and ride out the infection. We have fevers for a reason.”

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The Washington Post

Study suggests Pfizer vaccine works against virus variant

Frederic Bushman of the Perelman School of Medicine said there’s no reason to think the COVID-19 vaccines won’t work on new strains of the virus. “A mutation will change one little place, but it’s not going to disrupt binding to all of them,” he said.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Could cutting or delaying doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to immunize more people make the pandemic last longer?

Steven Joffe of the Perelman School of Medicine commented on the unknown efficacy of a single dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, which was designed to be given in two doses. “Those unknowns are why some people say, ‘We should stick with what we know. By all means, do the trials to test [varied regimens], but don’t just wing it.’ Others say, ‘We are in a race against the virus.’ I’m not going to come down on one side or the other,” he said.

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The Washington Post

You’ve seen many images from the Capitol riot. Here’s why it’s okay to take a break

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the effects of exposure to violent media imagery. “You don’t have to be there,” she said. “You can still be traumatized by watching things, hearing about them.”

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