Health Sciences

Shining a (UV) light on hospital infections

A rolling, six-foot-tall UV light device assigned to each floor of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania rids hospital rooms of harmful organisms after every discharge, preventing infection.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


PBS NewsHour

Genetic research has a white bias, and it may be hurting everyone’s health

PIK Professor Sarah Tishkoff and Giorgio Sirugo of the Perelman School of Medicine collaborated on a paper that concluded that predominately European genetic databases may lead to difficulties treating people from other racial backgrounds. “If we don’t include ethnically diverse populations, we are potentially going to be exacerbating health inequalities,” said Tishkoff.

FULL STORY →



Philadelphia Inquirer

Using catheter to replace heart valve better than open-heart surgery, studies suggest

Wilson Szeto of the Perelman School of Medicine said more research and “longer follow-up” are necessary to confirm beneficial outcomes from a new aortic-valve-replacement procedure.

FULL STORY →



Wired.co.uk

Genetic research is the wrong way to make sense of ADHD

Jason Schnittker of the School of Arts and Sciences said that linking mental illness to genetics won’t do much to reduce stigma. Instead, he proposed, “it would help to show that mental illnesses are common, even if they’re not diagnosed, and while they can be severe, they can be managed effectively.”

FULL STORY →



Today.com

Doctors weigh in on potential benefits of taking a cold shower

Helene Glassberg of the Perelman School of Medicine said those at risk of heart disease should avoid jumping into cold pools or showers. “Abrupt exposure to cold water causes your blood vessels to restrict, causes you to take a deep breath, causes your heart rate and blood pressure to potentially go up and this could potentially cause a stressor on the heart.”

FULL STORY →



Philadelphia Inquirer

5 questions: Is your body clock important?

Carsten Skarke of the Perelman School of Medicine offered a primer on chronobiology and how our body clocks might affect medical treatments. “The big hope is that we can find a way to synchronize the time of treatment with the molecular time of the patient.”

FULL STORY →