Health Sciences

Reprogramming ant ‘soldiers’

A Penn study reveals the epigenetic pathway that controls social behavior in carpenter ants, finding that the ants reprogram up to five days after they hatch, while reprogramming was ineffective at the 10-day mark.

Penn Today Staff

Pushing medical science forward, with bioethics

Alongside Nursing Dean Antonia M. Villarruel, Penn President Amy Gutmann and PIK Professor Jonathan Moreno discussed their new book “Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven but Nobody Wants to Die” at the Smilow Center for Translational Research.

Lauren Hertzler

Tweets from Twitter users could predict loneliness

By identifying similar themes across tweets, researchers are uncovering markers that could be used to predict loneliness, something that could lead to depression, heart disease, and dementia.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


WHYY (Philadelphia)

Dental school grads find it hard to beat back student debt

Dean Mark Wolff of the School of Dental Medicine said dental school tuition has increased because dentistry, in general, has gotten more expensive. “You used to get the X-rays in your mouth taken with film, put inside your mouth. Today, we put sensors inside the mouth, capture it directly into the computer,” he said. “Film used to cost a few dollars a pack. That sensor is a $7,000 sensor.”

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U.S. News & World Report

Antarctic study shows isolation, monotony may change the human brain

Alexander Stahn of the Perelman School of Medicine led a study that found a volume decrease in the hippocampi of explorers who spent 14 months at a research station in Antarctica. “It was an average of about 7%, which is really big in terms of brain changes,” he said.

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WHYY (Philadelphia)

Why mandated nurse-to-patient ratios have become one of the most controversial ideas in health care

Linda Aiken of the School of Nursing said that mandated nurse-to-patient ratios result in fewer complications, infections, and injuries, as well as lower mortality rates.

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The Washington Post

Do NAD-boosting supplements fight aging? Not according to current research

Joseph Baur of the Perelman School of Medicine said that while supplements claiming to increase NAD levels and improve longevity are unlikely to do harm, they’re ineffective when it comes to actually extending human life. “There have been several short-term clinical trials that have been mostly disappointing,” he said.

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Men’s Health

Wait, is it safe to take cold medicine when you’re breastfeeding?

Anna Graseck of the Perelman School of Medicine said, “Over-the-counter cold medicines are generally safe for breast feeding moms,” but warned that anything containing the decongestants pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine can impact the milk supply.

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