Health Sciences

Perelman School of Medicine students find their match

On March 15, 146 medical students from the Perelman School of Medicine celebrated Match Day—the national, annual ceremony, during which students learn where they will spend the next chapter of their journeys toward becoming physicians and surgeons. 

Penn Today Staff

The placebo cure

Drug researchers use control groups to measure the efficacy of their drug tests. What happens when the control group responds? Science proves the placebo effect is indeed medicine itself.

Tina Rodia

An implant to blunt opioid effects

A study by Penn Medicine researchers finds a slow-release naltrexone implant helps HIV patients with opioid dependence adhere to medications and prevent relapse.

Penn Today Staff

What is esketamine?

Following FDA approval of esketamine as a nasal spray to address otherwise untreatable cases of depression, Michael Thase, a professor of psychiatry at Penn Medicine, explains what it is and how it came to be.

Brandon Baker



In the News


U.S. News & World Report

What is syphilis, and why are rates rising?

Amy Forrestel of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the symptoms, spread, and long-term effects of syphilis. If left untreated, the sexually transmitted infection “can wreak a lot of havoc” on the body, said Forrestel.

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The Washington Post

A smarter way to think about willpower

Angela Duckworth of the School of Arts and Sciences and Katherine Milkman of the Wharton School are among co-authors of an op-ed about self-control. While many believe Americans’ willpower is on the decline, the authors write, “the scant scientific evidence on the question suggests that if anything, the capacity to delay gratification may be increasing.”

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NPR

First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as human gene-editing trials get underway

A clinical trial led by Edward Stadtmauer of the Perelman School of Medicine will be using CRISPR to treat cancer patients.

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Associated Press

Senior’s weakness for scams may be warning sign of dementia

Jason Karlawish of the Perelman School of Medicine said a recent study on aging and scam awareness doesn’t prove a link between susceptibility and cognitive decline in seniors. However, Karlawish says, the results “should be a call to action to health care systems, the financial services industry and their regulators.”

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The Washington Post

New cancer therapies offer great hope, but there can be surprising complications

Ravi Parikh of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about rapid advances in cancer therapies. While excited about the possibilities, Parikh notes that new treatments come with new side effects, among other complications.

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