Health Sciences

The road to more hand transplants

Over the past 20 years, more than 85 amputees around the world have received a hand or bilateral hand transplant—including two adults and one child at Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Penn Today Staff

Boots on the ground for the opioid task force

Opioid addiction is a “public health emergency,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Overdose deaths involving opioids—both prescription and illegal—have increased fivefold between 1999 and 2016.

Penn Today Staff

Injection improves vision in a form of childhood blindness

A new treatment for patients with a form of congenital retinal blindness has shown success in improving vision, according to results published today in Nature Medicine led by researchers at the Scheie Eye Institute in the Perelman School of Medicine

Penn Today Staff

Podcast series charts a path for Latin Americans in science

Concerned about the scarcity of Latin Americans in scientific careers, doctoral students Kevin Alicea-Torres and Enrique Lin-Shiao took action to prime the pump. On their Spanish-language podcast, “Caminos en Ciencia,” they chat with Latinx scientists who discuss their career paths and provide advice for young scientists-to-be.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


Science

Poor sleep could clog your arteries. A mouse study shows how that might happen

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Namni Goel weighed in on a new study that found that poor sleep can clog arteries.

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Men’s Health

Why gene editing may hold the promise of a herpes cure

Sita Awasthi of the Perelman School of Medicine discussed the challenges researchers face in pursuing a cure for herpes. In spite of advances in CRISPR technology, Awasthi emphasizes the continued need for a preventive vaccine.

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Reuters Health

Hospitals serving more minorities may offer less palliative care

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Kate Courtright commented on new findings that hospitals that primarily serve minorities provide their patients with less palliative care than other hospitals.

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The Wall Street Journal

How community health workers could create less-costly, higher-quality care

A study by Shreya Kangovi of the Perelman School of Medicine offered evidence that a comprehensive community health worker program, similar to those implemented in countries with shortages of doctors and nurses, could be effective in the U.S.

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Men’s Health

So, Meghan Markle is using a ‘doula’—What’s the deal with that?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Sindhu Srinivas commented on the increasing number of doulas employed by hospitals. Obstetricians “can’t be in the room the whole time, but doulas can, which can help women feel more supported,” said Srinivas.

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