Health Sciences

Is dog walking hazardous to senior health?

Between 2004 and 2017, dog walking related fractures in people 65 or older more than doubled, and two factors are the cause: increased pet ownership and a greater emphasis, in recent years, on physical activity at older ages.

Penn Today Staff

To prevent HIV, start online

A team led by José Bauermeister at Penn Nursing designed the My Desires & Expectations tool to address cognitive and emotional factors that influence sexual decision-making when seeking partners online.

Penn Today Staff

Using stairwells for wellness

StairWELL, a Penn Sustainability Green Fund project, completed a yearlong pilot project last July that aimed to test how effective a stairwell makeover could be in increasing physical activity and reducing energy costs.

Brandon Baker

What’s overlooked can be fatal

New research shows that spontaneous coronary artery dissection is not only far more common than was previously thought, but that patients may benefit most from conservative treatment that allows the body to heal on its own.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


U.S. News & World Report

What is syphilis, and why are rates rising?

Amy Forrestel of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the symptoms, spread, and long-term effects of syphilis. If left untreated, the sexually transmitted infection “can wreak a lot of havoc” on the body, said Forrestel.

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The Washington Post

A smarter way to think about willpower

Angela Duckworth of the School of Arts and Sciences and Katherine Milkman of the Wharton School are among co-authors of an op-ed about self-control. While many believe Americans’ willpower is on the decline, the authors write, “the scant scientific evidence on the question suggests that if anything, the capacity to delay gratification may be increasing.”

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NPR

First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as human gene-editing trials get underway

A clinical trial led by Edward Stadtmauer of the Perelman School of Medicine will be using CRISPR to treat cancer patients.

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Associated Press

Senior’s weakness for scams may be warning sign of dementia

Jason Karlawish of the Perelman School of Medicine said a recent study on aging and scam awareness doesn’t prove a link between susceptibility and cognitive decline in seniors. However, Karlawish says, the results “should be a call to action to health care systems, the financial services industry and their regulators.”

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The Washington Post

New cancer therapies offer great hope, but there can be surprising complications

Ravi Parikh of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about rapid advances in cancer therapies. While excited about the possibilities, Parikh notes that new treatments come with new side effects, among other complications.

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