Health Sciences

CAR T cell therapy leads to lasting remissions

In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor CAR T cell therapy Kymriah® led to long-lasting remissions in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

Penn Today Staff

Physical rehab helps ‘rock star’ Ranger walk again

After successful surgery to relieve spinal compression, four-year-old Australian cattle dog Ranger faced just a 50 percent chance of ever regaining use of his back legs. Penn Vet's rehab team aimed to get the pup back on his feet.

Penn Today Staff

Breaking through the medical fake news bubble

In a new perspective piece published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Raina Merchant and David A. Asch provide some guidance for medical professionals and scientists as they wade into online discussions.  

Penn Today Staff

Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much

Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, Gideon Nave of the Wharton School and Philipp Koellinger of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence, but only accounts for two percent of the variation in smarts.

Katherine Unger Baillie

Why we have hair here, but not there

A new study answers a fundamental question in human evolution about how and where hair grows on the body, and reveals the existence of a naturally-occurring inhibitor to hair growth.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Science

Poor sleep could clog your arteries. A mouse study shows how that might happen

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Namni Goel weighed in on a new study that found that poor sleep can clog arteries.

FULL STORY →



Men’s Health

Why gene editing may hold the promise of a herpes cure

Sita Awasthi of the Perelman School of Medicine discussed the challenges researchers face in pursuing a cure for herpes. In spite of advances in CRISPR technology, Awasthi emphasizes the continued need for a preventive vaccine.

FULL STORY →



Reuters Health

Hospitals serving more minorities may offer less palliative care

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Kate Courtright commented on new findings that hospitals that primarily serve minorities provide their patients with less palliative care than other hospitals.

FULL STORY →



The Wall Street Journal

How community health workers could create less-costly, higher-quality care

A study by Shreya Kangovi of the Perelman School of Medicine offered evidence that a comprehensive community health worker program, similar to those implemented in countries with shortages of doctors and nurses, could be effective in the U.S.

FULL STORY →



Men’s Health

So, Meghan Markle is using a ‘doula’—What’s the deal with that?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Sindhu Srinivas commented on the increasing number of doulas employed by hospitals. Obstetricians “can’t be in the room the whole time, but doulas can, which can help women feel more supported,” said Srinivas.

FULL STORY →