Health Sciences

What’s the future of blood pressure monitoring?

Blood pressure monitoring is evolving for more convenience, comfort and accessibility, and may feature innovative methods, like customized “smart” sneakers, or by taking a two-minute video selfie.

Penn Today Staff

A Quarter-century of Community Partnerships

Glen Casey will be the first to admit it: He wasn’t the perfect student in high school. “I was always doing the dumbest things; getting into fights, getting arrested,” he says. A student then at University City High, Casey failed ninth grade, and barely passed 10th. “I just really wasn’t into school,” he says.



In the News


Health.com

What is trypanophobia? How to cope with a fear of needles so you can get the COVID-19 vaccine

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine offered tips for overcoming fear of needles in order to get the COVID-19 vaccine, starting with just making the appointment. "More doing and less thinking is an important way to overcome your fear," she said.

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The New York Times

Why are we so afraid of fevers?

Paul Offit of the Perelman School of Medicine said treating fevers can prolong or worsen an illness because immunity works better at higher temperatures. While fever reducers can relieve uncomfortable symptoms, “You’re not supposed to feel better,” he said. “You’re supposed to stay under the covers, keep warm, and ride out the infection. We have fevers for a reason.”

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The Washington Post

Study suggests Pfizer vaccine works against virus variant

Frederic Bushman of the Perelman School of Medicine said there’s no reason to think the COVID-19 vaccines won’t work on new strains of the virus. “A mutation will change one little place, but it’s not going to disrupt binding to all of them,” he said.

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The Washington Post

You’ve seen many images from the Capitol riot. Here’s why it’s okay to take a break

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the effects of exposure to violent media imagery. “You don’t have to be there,” she said. “You can still be traumatized by watching things, hearing about them.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Could cutting or delaying doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to immunize more people make the pandemic last longer?

Steven Joffe of the Perelman School of Medicine commented on the unknown efficacy of a single dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, which was designed to be given in two doses. “Those unknowns are why some people say, ‘We should stick with what we know. By all means, do the trials to test [varied regimens], but don’t just wing it.’ Others say, ‘We are in a race against the virus.’ I’m not going to come down on one side or the other,” he said.

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