School of Veterinary Medicine

Seven Penn researchers receive NIH Director Awards

Seven researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Engineering and Applied Science are to receive National Institutes of Health Director Awards, highly competitive grants to support innovative biomedical research.

Penn Today Staff

Penn One Health goes abroad

In August, Penn Vet student James Ferrara will combine veterinary research and public health outreach in Nepal, where he will join a team of graduate students conducting research on Campylobacter, a bacteria found in unpasteurized milk, that is prone to cause infection.

Jacob Williamson-Rea



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Guess what these young dinosaurs ate when their parents weren’t looking

Peter Dodson of the School of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences offered commentary on young dinosaurs’ ability to independently forage for vegetation. “It seems like a pretty fair bet that there wasn’t parental care,” said Dodson.

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The New York Times

Dog deaths after grooming documented, but link uncertain

Perry Habecker of the School of Veterinary Medicine said that, while dogs dying at the groomer is uncommon, the mere possibility is one of groomers’ biggest fears.

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The New York Times

As animal-assisted therapy thrives, enter the cats

The School of Veterinary Medicine’s James A. Serpell weighed in on the lack of formal research about the efficacy of animal-assisted therapies. Serpell did note that it’s been well proven that social interaction does generally benefit human health.

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Daily Beast

Do cancer-sniffing canines pass the smell test?

A.T. Charlie Johnson Jr. of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and the School of Arts and Sciences hopes to use technology developed by Penn Vet’s Working Dog Center to detect ovarian and other forms of cancer.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

How to Keep Your Dogs and Cats Cool When It’s Hot

The School of Veterinary Medicine’s Ken Drobatz offered advice for keeping dogs safe in the summer heat. Cats, said Drobatz, are less prone to over-exercising and will instinctively “decrease their activity and find a cool area to just lay there.”

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