Science & Technology

Wired up at FemmeHacks

Penn President Amy Gutmann and Vijay Kumar, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, visited the all-women collegiate hackathon this weekend.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Science News

Physics explains how pollen gets its stunning diversity of shapes

The School of Arts and Sciences’ Alison Sweeney explained how phase separation contributes to the unique shapes of pollen grains.

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NBC News

Mood-forecasting tech could help stop bad moods before they even strike

Sharath Guntuku of Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health said that “based on how we use technology, our mental state can be predicted.”

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Science News

A new insulation material is practically weightless yet still durable

The School of Engineering and Applied Science’s Deep Jariwala commented on a new, nearly weightless insulation material made of porous aerogel capable of withstanding temperature shifts of over 1,000 degrees Celsius. “It’s notoriously hard to make materials that are not just lightweight but can also be heavily heat resistant.”

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Christian Science Monitor

Have you heard the buzz? Honeybees can count

Elizabeth Brannon and postdoc Rosa Rugani of the School of Arts and Sciences discussed new research about honeybees’ ability to add and subtract numbers. Brannon said bees use ratios, rather than exact digits, to understand quantities. “When animals are comparing two numerical values, they’re much better if they differ by a large ratio than if they differ by a very small ratio,” she said.

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The Conversation

People don’t trust blockchain systems—Is regulation a way to help?

The Wharton School’s Kevin Werbach wrote about blockchain and the contradiction between its “allegedly trust-less technology and its trust-needing users.”

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Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane (WHYY-FM)

Protecting your privacy online

The Annenberg School for Communication’s Joseph Turow joined a conversation on about data mining and online privacy.

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The Hill

The false trade-offs of personal data protection

The Annenberg School for Communication’s Joseph Turow was cited for his research, which found that most Americans don’t believe trading data for discounts is “a square deal.”

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Technical.ly Philly

For a glimpse into the future, look at aerial robotics

An event about aerial robotics with the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s dean Vijay Kumar is featured.

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Gizmodo

Blue pigment in 1,000-year-old teeth links women to the production of medieval manuscripts

The Libraries’ Nicholas Herman offered commentary on a study that used bio-archaeology to identify ultramarine in the dental tartar of an 11th-century woman in rural Germany. “Only by looking very closely at new kinds of evidence can we begin to discover the true importance of female artisans,” said Herman.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Are bigger brains smarter? Barely, says study led by Penn scholar

A new study co-led by the Wharton School’s Gideon Nave and the School of Arts and Sciences’ Joseph Kable found that brain size has a slight, but ultimately insignificant, correlation to intelligence.

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