Science & Technology

Fruitful insights on the brain

Research led by China Byrns of the lab of Nancy M. Bonini in the School of Arts & Sciences have uncovered new details about the role of zombie-like cells in brain aging, using the fruit fly as a model.

Nathi Magubane

Penn Engineering’s Ottman Tertuliano receives a 2024 CAREER Award

Tertuliano’s research on bone fractures at the nanoscale allows for research on two separate time scales: the forming of cracks in a fracture at 1 micrometer/second, and the cellular response and repair time scale, a much lengthier process.

From Penn Engineering Today

Brewing brilliance

Nader Engheta and Firooz Aflatouni of Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science turn tea time into new ideas.

Ian Scheffler, Nathi Magubane

The key to fixing AI bias and copyright infringement

Penn Engineering’s Michael Kearns, National Center Professor of Management & Technology, questions whether model disgorgement can potentially solve a number of problems related to AI.

From Penn Engineering

More than two hearts beat as one

PIK Professor Michael Platt and collaborators studied how physiologic measures like cardiac synchrony can guide decision making in groups. Their study found that heart rate synchrony was a much better predictor than standard questionnaire-based surveys.

Nathi Magubane



In the News


The Telegraph

Antibiotics created from extinct species could fight infections

César de la Fuente of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and Perelman School of Medicine and colleagues are using AI algorithms to find antibiotics in extinct animal species.

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The New York Times

Harrison White, groundbreaking (and inscrutable) sociologist, dies at 94

Randall Collins of the School of Arts & Sciences and PIK Professor Duncan J. Watts discuss the career of the late Harrison White, a theoretical physicist-turned-sociologist.

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Smithsonian Magazine

The western U.S. is sweltering under a ‘heat dome.’ What does that mean?

A study by Michael Mann of the School of Arts & Sciences finds that climate change favors the jet stream behavior that produces stagnant high-pressure systems and the extreme heat and drought associated with them.

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MSNBC

Getting off a ‘highway to climate hell’

Michael Mann of the School of Arts & Sciences discusses the UN’s climate-change warnings amidst record-breaking global heat.

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Philadelphia Magazine

Should we trust AI? A Penn expert weighs in

In a Q&A, Chris Callison-Burch of the School of Engineering and Applied Science discusses the new frontiers and existential dread surrounding AI.

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The Guardian

AI used to predict potential new antibiotics in groundbreaking study

A study by César de la Fuente of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and Perelman School of Medicine used machine learning to predict potential new antibiotics in the global microbiome.

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The New York Times

When hydropower runs dry

Shelley Welton of Penn Carey Law and the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the Weitzman School of Design says that North America needs a more interconnected electric grid with better scenario and long-term planning.

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Newsweek

Daily omega-3 supplements may change your behavior, scientists reveal

A study by Adrian Raine of the School of Arts & Sciences suggests that daily omega-3 supplements can lead to a reduction in aggressive behavior.

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Tampa Bay Times

These trees made Florida’s Hillsborough County over $1 million for their climate benefits. Is it legit?

Danny Cullenward of the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the Weitzman School of Design says that carbon credit programs do more harm than good in the fight against climate change.

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Salon.com

The world’s oceans just broke an important climate change record

Michael Mann of the School of Arts & Sciences says that the warming of the oceans is helping to destabilize ice shelves and fuel more powerful hurricanes and tropical cyclones.

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