Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Bolivia: Coup or election fraud?

Quechua scholar Américo Mendoza-Mori and political scientist Tulia Falleti discuss the ousting of the country’s first indigenous president and the tumultuous state of Bolivian politics as the country prepares for elections in May.

Kristina García

Visualizing future cities with Zhongjie Lin

A new three-year project called called “Spatial Visions Connecting China and the West: A Centennial Review and New Perspectives on Future Urban Environments” will address global issues like climate change and migration will begin at Penn and travel to Beijing.

Penn Today Staff

A history of U.S.-Iran relations

John Ghazvinian, interim director of the Middle East Center and an expert on Iran/U.S. relations, talks about the countries’ historical relationship and what led to the current situation.

Kristen de Groot

Alice Paul and the ERA

After almost a hundred years, the Equal Rights Amendment may finally be ratified as an amendment to the Constitution, guaranteeing equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex. Mary Frances Berry, Kathleen M. Brown and Maria Murphy discuss what ratification could mean.

Kristina García

Iranian commander killed—five things to know

A United States drone struck and killed a powerful Iranian military commander at an Iraqi airport, bringing vows of retribution from Iran and threatening to plunge the region into chaos. An expert on Iran shares her thoughts on the attack.

Kristen de Groot

Brendan O’Leary: Whatever you say, say everything

The political science professor’s career, from aiding in the negotiating of peace in Northern Ireland to advising the Prime Minister of Kurdistan, has been guided by a simple principle: Say exactly what you mean.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

With 2020 election, Women’s March on Philadelphia ‘more important now than ever,’ organizers say

Dawn Teele of the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about the Women’s March, calling it “a cathartic show of solidarity rather than a solid movement with a specific end.”

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The Atlantic

Prohibition was a failed experiment in moral governance

Samuel Freeman of the School of Arts and Sciences and Law School spoke about the “failed experiment” of the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. constitution, which installed Prohibition, calling it “an amendment that had to do with a matter of private morality [that] didn’t work.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Netflix series ‘13 Reasons Why’ did not increase number of teen suicides, study finds

Dan Romer of the Annenberg Public Policy Center reanalyzed data on adolescent suicides and found no evidence of a significant increase in suicides after the release of Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” series. “Researchers are looking for that negative effect, and maybe ignoring the fact that some of these shows may help people,” he said. “For some people, the show reduced suicidal tendencies, but it also had a detrimental effect on others. You can’t disentangle them.”

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Vice

Opioids are killing more than twice as many people as we thought

A study led by Samuel Preston of the School of Arts and Sciences found 60,000 more drug-related deaths in 2016 than previously recorded.

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Associated Press

U.S.-Iran relations: A look back at a tricky relationship

John Ghazvinian of the School of Arts and Sciences discussed how the relationship between the U.S. and Iran has transformed over the years. “It’s only in the later 20th and 21st centuries that we have been seeing this kind of slow and difficult degeneration in the relationship,” he said. “I think that’s the big picture we have to keep in mind: It doesn’t have to be so hateful.”

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