Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Dissecting the Green New Deal

During what’s likely the largest climate event ever held at Penn, leaders in a range of fields discussed the practicalities and implications of the resolution introduced into Congress in February aimed at stemming climate change.

Michele W. Berger

Improving journalists’ access to public information records

A study by the Media, Inequality and Change Center and the Center for Media at Risk of Pennsylvania-based journalists, was conducted in order to highlight their experiences with Pennsylvania’s Right-to-Know Law, analyzing how journalists’ Freedom of Information requests have resulted.

Penn Today Staff

Fall into the arts

An active time of year for the arts community, the University’s fall arts and culture offerings range from a sculpture exhibit from Jaume Plensa, at Arthur Ross Gallery, to a viewing garden along the Rail Park.

Brandon Baker

What is ‘guaranteed income’?

A Q&A with Amy Castro Baker, an assistant professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice and co-principal investigator of a new study examining the impacts of guaranteed income.

Brandon Baker



In the News


The Washington Post

Collection of premier proverb scholar opens at UVM

Dan Ben-Amos of the School of Arts and Sciences said Wolfgang Mieder of the University of Vermont is “one of the greatest proverb scholars of all times and the greatest of our generation.”

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Time

What to know about the origins of ‘left’ and ‘right’ in politics, from the French Revolution to the 2020 presidential race

Sophia Rosenfeld and Brent Cebul of the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about the use of “left” and “right” in political discourse. The terms began as “literal descriptions,” said Rosenfeld, of the seating patterns in 18th-century France’s post-revolution National Assembly.

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The New York Times

Should the government give everyone $1,000 a month?

Ioana Marinescu of the School of Social Policy & Practice was quoted for her defense of universal basic income, which some have claimed would create an unmotivated workforce. “It reduces the number of hours individuals work but not the total number of people classified as employed,” she said.

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The Washington Post

Expect the new Italian government to be as short-lived as the last one. Here’s why

Julia Lynch of the School of Arts and Sciences co-wrote an analysis of the state of Italian politics. While Matteo Salvini, “right-wing nationalist” and former deputy prime minister and interior minister, has been ousted from the Italian government, Lynch and her co-author believe “Salvini may be back soon, stronger than before.”

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The New York Times

How John Bolton broke the National Security Council

John Gans of Perry World House wrote an opinion piece about John Bolton’s tenure as national security advisor, which ended this week. “Mr. Bolton’s most lasting legacy will be dismantling the structure that has kept American foreign policy from collapsing into chaos, and finally unshackling an irregular commander-in-chief,” Gans wrote.

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