Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Understanding civic engagement

In the latest episode of Penn Today’s ‘Understand This …’ podcast series, Herman Beavers of the School of Arts & Sciences and Glenn Bryan of the Office of Government and Community Affairs discuss civic engagement—and jazz.

Brandon Baker

A watershed created to power New York City

Anna Lehr Mueser, a doctoral candidate in history and sociology of science, studies memory, loss, and technology in the New York City Watershed and the villages that were destroyed to construct it.

From OMNIA



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Guided mastery: The scaffolding you need to grow stronger

Angela Duckworth of the School of Arts & Sciences wrote about the importance of imbuing young people with a sense of personal agency. “Don’t tell anyone they have complete control of their destiny. That’s not true,” she said. “And yet each of us, no matter our circumstances, has some control, particularly over our own thoughts and actions.”

FULL STORY →



Bloomberg

Can China’s prosperity promise fix real problems?

Hanming Fang of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about China’s pension system, saying that because the plans are managed by local governments, the system is vulnerable to regional wage disparities.

FULL STORY →



The Conversation

The Catholic Church sex abuse crisis: 4 essential reads

Melissa Wilde of the School of Arts & Sciences pinpoints moments when the Catholic Church changed course.

FULL STORY →



Reuters

How AT&T helped build far-right One America News

Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center spoke about the origins of Fox News and OAN. “If somebody recognizes there’s a market for something and there’s a lot of money attached to that market, you get a news outlet,” she said.

FULL STORY →



CBS Philadelphia

Philadelphia pottery artist Roberto Lugo

Robert Lugo, whose installation is on view at the Arthur Ross Gallery, was interviewed about using his artwork to engage the local community and challenge popular notions about class, race, and pottery.

FULL STORY →