Law

David Hoffman on broken contracts during pandemics

Law professsor David Hoffman argues that there isn’t a precedent, outside a major unexpected event, to keep a party from fulfilling a contract. The pandemic raises a questions about obligations, public policy, and public health.

From Penn Law

Coding for a cause

As the viral pandemic shuttered campus and disrupted routines, The Borders and Boundaries Project turned the challenging situation into a chance to give back and get work done.

Kristen de Groot

Child abuse is Marci Hamilton’s Goliath

Marci Hamilton, Fels Institute of Government Professor of Practice, has faced down institutional child abuse for decades—and she is just getting started.

From Omnia

AI technology in courts and administrative agencies

A forthcoming article co-authored by Penn Law’s Cary Coglianese explores algorithmic governance, examining how machine-learning algorithms are currently used by federal and state courts and agencies to support their decision-making.

From Penn Law



In the News


The Washington Post

Schumer’s overblown attack on GOP proposal for medical malpractice lawsuits

Allison Hoffman of the Law School said the Republican-proposed Safe to Work Act wouldn’t wholly prevent medical malpractice lawsuits, as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has suggested it would, saying that it would actually only apply to coronavirus-related health care services. However, she said, the bill does have other concerning loopholes.

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Forbes

What to do about contracts during COVID-19

David Hoffman of the Law School and a University of Virginia Law School colleague published a paper about the impact of COVID-19 on contracts. They recommend renegotiating contracts to minimize damages over trying to enforce or fight the terms.

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Associated Press

Trump talks up his rule-cutting, but courts saying otherwise

Cary Coglianese of the Law School said the Trump administration has both limited the implementation of new regulations and repealed many existing ones. “There’s a lot more smoke-and-mirrors to the deregulatory picture than the administration paints,” he said. “It’s certainly not at all the driver of economic growth during the pre-COVID period of the administration, and it’s certainly not enough to take us out of the economic troubles we find ourselves in.”

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The Washington Post

Conservative media helps Trump perform ‘law and order’ in Portland, with risks for November

Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center spoke about media coverage of the federal crackdown in Portland, Oregon. “The framing of this is dramatically different news channel to news channel, and this is an instance in which the visuals are difficult to understand because you’re seeing people in what look to be a kind of military uniform, and it’s unfolding at night,” she said.

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ABC News

Supreme Court rejects Trump claim of 'absolute immunity' from grand jury subpoena for tax returns

Claire Finkelstein of the Law School commented on this week’s Supreme Court ruling on presidential immunity from subpoenas. "The Court has now said, guess what, it is constitutionally permissible to investigate a sitting president," she said. "And that has the backward implications that it is also potentially constitutionally permissible to indict a sitting president."

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Forbes

Meet the forgotten woman who forever change date lives of LGBTQ+ workers

Serena Mayeri of the Law School and School of Arts & Sciences spoke about Pauli Murray’s effort to include “sex” in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. “There’s this pernicious myth that the sex amendment was some kind of joke, or fluke, or a poison pill that was designed to sink the Civil Rights Act,” Mayeri said, “when in fact it really was the product of the deliberate efforts by advocates for women.”

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