Coronavirus Research

Making sense of coronavirus statistics

Wharton professor Adi Wyner digs into the statistics about the COVID-19 outbreak and offers insights into what the numbers mean.

From Wharton Stories



In the News


The Wall Street Journal

Novartis inks deal to make experimental coronavirus vaccines

The pharmaceutical company Novartis has agreed to manufacture a gene-based coronavirus vaccine that Penn helped develop.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

All 50 states are now reopening. But at what cost?

Kent Smetters of the Wharton School spoke about the School’s modeling of state reopenings and coronavirus risk. “Everyone wants us to talk about policy, but in fact personal behavior still matters a lot here,” he said.

FULL STORY →



Voice of America

Can dogs sniff out COVID-19

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about efforts to train dogs to sniff out COVID-19. “We need to first confirm that there is an odor associated with the virus and that we can detect it in the samples,” she said.

FULL STORY →



KYW Newsradio (Philadelphia)

Penn is training dogs to sniff out COVID-19 in humans

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about the Working Dog Center’s efforts to train dogs to detect COVID-19 in humans. “Basically, we are looking at urine samples. We are hoping to look at saliva and breath samples as well,” she said. “We are going to tell basically if there is an odor excreted in these samples.”

FULL STORY →



The Washington Post

Experiment shows human speech generates droplets that linger in the air for more than 8 minutes

Christina Bax of the Perelman School of Medicine co-authored a study that found human speech can emit small respiratory droplets that can linger in the air for more than eight minutes, potentially contributing to the spread of the coronavirus.

FULL STORY →



Morning Edition (NPR)

Researchers experiment to see if dogs can detect COVID-19

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about the potential use of scent-detecting dogs to identify COVID-19 in humans.

FULL STORY →