Emergency Medicine

Hands-on medical simulation, simplified

Elizabeth Sanseau of CHOP and Annenberg’s Kyle Cassidy discuss Annenberg Hotkeys, a medical simulator developed during the pandemic to remotely prepare health care providers for emergency situations.

Marilyn Perkins

Ultrasound medical education puts insight in hand

An integrated four-year ultrasound curriculum helps Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine students build competence and confidence in the classroom and the clinic.

Karen L. Brooks for Penn Medicine Magazine



In the News


Newsweek

Dog respiratory illness map update: Mystery disease spreads to more states

Deborah Silverstein of the School of Veterinary Medicine says that the dogs most at risk for respiratory illness are those with low immunity, such as young puppies, the unvaccinated, or older dogs, and potentially short-nosed breeds.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Mystery respiratory dog illness has pet owners concerned. Here’s what vets are saying

Deborah Silverstein of the School of Veterinary Medicine says that a mysterious respiratory canine illness is likely a resurgence of some of the organisms seen with kennel cough.

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6ABC.com

Pennsylvania dog owners take precautions as mysterious illness continues to spread

Deborah Silverstein of the School of Veterinary Medicine suggests that dog owners be on the lookout for symptoms similar to kennel cough, like bouts of coughing, sneezing, eye and nasal discharge, and lethargy.

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The New York Times

Just what the (urgent care) doctor ordered

Ari Friedman of the Perelman School of Medicine says that increased numbers of treated patients are slowing down the pace of medical treatment, which has led to the rise of urgent care centers.

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The Wall Street Journal

How to know whether to go to your doctor, or visit urgent care

Ari Friedman of the Perelman School of Medicine explains when it’s better to go to a primary care doctor or the emergency department than to an urgent care clinic.

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Associated Press

Election offices are sent envelopes with fentanyl or other substances. Authorities are investigating

Jeanmarie Perrone of the Perelman School of Medicine says that studies simulating exposure from opening envelopes containing powders showed that very little, if any, of the powder becomes aerosolized to cause toxicity through inhalation.

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