Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Why don’t women promote themselves?

Wharton’s Judd Kessler co-authored a study, “The Gender Gap in Self-Promotion,” which measured confidence and self-promotion among women about their performance at work.

Penn Today Staff

Less and later marriage in South Korea

Sociologist Hyunjoon Park sheds light on why marriage rates are falling in South Korea, particularly among highly educated women and low-educated men.

Penn Today Staff

Alice Paul and the ERA

After almost a hundred years, the Equal Rights Amendment may finally be ratified as an amendment to the Constitution, guaranteeing equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex. Mary Frances Berry, Kathleen M. Brown and Maria Murphy discuss what ratification could mean.

Kristina García

Seeing life through their eyes

Through the voices and stories of seven men, a feature-length documentary co-produced and directed by Annenberg Dean John L. Jackson Jr. and graduate student Nora Gross illustrates what it means to be black and gay in the south.

Michele W. Berger

Paid family leave: What’s the right model?

With companies exploring gender biases in the workplace, the issue of parental leave highlights gender inequality and brings all parents into the fold when analyzing family leave policies.

Penn Today Staff

How gender and racial biases are hurting economics

Following a survey released this month by the American Economic Association that reveals a disturbingly high level of gender bias in the field, Wharton’s Olivia S. Mitchell discusses the effects of gender and racial biases in the field of economics.

Penn Today Staff

Making a movement from #MeToo

At Perry World House Monday, activists from around the world talked about how they’re working to make sure the stories of women and girls are told—and heard.

Gwyneth K. Shaw



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In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Women’s work: 12 stories of female success and struggle in male-dominated fields

PIK Professor Dorothy Roberts, Angela Duckworth of the School of Arts of Sciences, and Julie Engiles of the School of Veterinary Medicine were interviewed for a photo-essay about being women in the workplace.

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The New York Times

Women’s unpaid labor is worth $10,900,000,000,000

In honor of International Women’s Day, Kristen Ghodsee of the School of Arts and Sciences co-wrote a piece about women’s unpaid labor, which is not factored into GDP calculations: “Women provide a huge unacknowledged subsidy to the smooth functioning of our economies, which would grind to a halt if women stopped doing this work.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

With 2020 election, Women’s March on Philadelphia ‘more important now than ever,’ organizers say

Dawn Teele of the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about the Women’s March, calling it “a cathartic show of solidarity rather than a solid movement with a specific end.”

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Smithsonian Magazine

The 96-year-history of the Equal Rights Amendment

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts and Sciences spoke about the Equal Rights Amendment and the obstacles that have prevented it from being ratified and added to the Constitution.

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Smithsonian Magazine

Women scientists were written out of history. It’s Margaret Rossiter’s lifelong mission to fix that

M. Susan Lindee of the School of Arts and Sciences praised academic Margaret Rossiter’s research on women’s contributions to science. “We have to look at her past work carefully,” said Lindee, “and re-examine all those brilliant strategies that women used to contest institutional power, which was oriented around preventing them from succeeding.”

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The New York Times

Interrupting is different for men and women, even on debate stage

Adam Grant of the Wharton School spoke about gender dynamics in the Democratic presidential debates. “Female candidates face a double bind: stay silent and fail to be heard, or speak up and get judged as too aggressive,” he said.

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