Obstetrics

Toward more optimal birth outcomes

A new study from Penn Nursing is the first to assess hospital vaginal birth rates rather than cesarean rates, which can further quality improvement initiatives that focus on encouraging vaginal birth rather than on decreasing the cesarean birth rate.

From Penn Nursing News



In the News


The New York Times

The White House issues its first-ever proclamation on Black maternal health

Elizabeth Howell of the Perelman School of Medicine said that severe maternal morbidity, in which women experience severe complications related to pregnancy and childbirth, impacts more than 50,000 U.S. women each year. “Similar to maternal mortality, Black and brown women have elevated rates of maternal morbidity,” she said.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

I sang through labor to manage the pain

Veena Graff of the Perelman School of Medicine weighed in on how singing may be able to aid the birth process. “Mechanistically, the act of singing helps with breathing and is a great distraction method, which in turn can relax a woman while experiencing labor pains,” she said.

FULL STORY →



WHYY (Philadelphia)

Black babies are twice as likely to be born preterm. CHOP doctors are using COVID-19 to explore why

Heather Burris and Jaya Aysola of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the pandemic’s effects on preexisting preterm birth and prenatal care disparities.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

Evidence builds that pregnant women pass COVID antibodies to newborns

Scott Hensley and Karen Puopolo of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about their study of pregnancy and COVID-19. The team found evidence that COVID-19 antibodies can cross the placenta, though it’s still unknown if the amount of antibodies passed on can prevent newborns from contracting the virus.

FULL STORY →



Business Insider

How to regulate your blood sugar during pregnancy with a 7-day gestational diabetes meal plan

Kimberly Trout of the School of Nursing recommended a meal plan for people with gestational diabetes. Research suggests that about 80% of people with this condition can manage it with diet alone, she said.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

I’m a pregnant doctor. Should I get the COVID vaccine?

Michal Elovitz of the Perelman School of Medicine said it’s possible that an mRNA-based vaccine could potentially cause harm to a developing fetus, but that there’s not enough data to know for sure. “To avoid having pregnant people guess, we should be advocating for more preclinical and clinical research focused on pregnant patients,” she said.

FULL STORY →