Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Penn Awarded Funding for Critical Zone Observatory Project

PHILADELPHIA –- Environmentalists from the University of Pennsylvania have been awarded a $4.35 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to establish a Critical Zone Observatory in Puerto Rico.

Jordan Reese

Penn Grad Sarah-Jane Littleford Named Rhodes Scholar

 PHILADELPHIA –- Sarah-Jane Littleford, a 2009 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for study at Oxford University in England. Littleford, who is from Harare, Zimbabwe, was one of two Rhodes Scholars selected from that country. She learned of the honor today after an interview with the selection committee.

Julie McWilliams

Penn, Georgia Collaboration Awarded $14.6 Million to Expand Pathogen Database, Expedite Worldwide Research

PHILADELPHIA -– Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Georgia have been awarded a five-year, $14.6 million contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the US National Institutes of Health, to expand and extend work on the Eukaryotic Pathogen Genome Database Resource, http://EuPathDB.org.

Jordan Reese

Penn Hosts Daylong Arts Crawl Today

WHAT: As part of the Arts and the City Year event series, the University of Pennsylvania will hold its first “Arts Crawl,” a full day of events offered by more than two dozen arts and culture groups. WHO:Arts and Culture groups from campus, as well as the Philadelphia region

Julie McWilliams



In the News


Huffington Post

Right-wing radio reaches tens of millions. Its coronavirus conspiracies are out of control

Brian Rosenwald of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about the popularity of conservative talk radio hosts, who maintain close relationships with their listeners. “They may listen 15 hours a week to that host. For Rush [Limbaugh], they might have been doing that for 30 years and they might spend more time with him than they spend with their spouse,” Rosenwald said. “It’s a deeper bond.”

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Science

No asteroids needed: ancient mass extinction tied to ozone loss, warming climate

Lauren Sallan of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about the end of the Devonian period 359 million years ago, in which the ozone layer was damaged, resulting in a mass extinction. The discovery is significant to today’s climate change research.

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NPR

Phase One frenzies; provocative predictions; the bread boom

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about predictions she made back in March about how the coronavirus pandemic would change the world. Berry reiterated her initial prediction that society will crave more distraction and entertainment in the aftermath of the crisis.

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The Wall Street Journal

How architects are already planning the future of offices

Marion Weiss of the Stuart Weitzman School of Design spoke about the future of office architecture. “Employers may have fewer people on premises at any one time, but they may need more space per person,” she said.

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Associated Press

US births fall, and virus could drive them down more

Hans-Peter Kohler of the School of Arts & Sciences commented on the possibility of a further decline in birth rates due to the coronavirus. The question isn’t whether or not there will be decline, but rather if the decline will be lasting, he said.

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