Education, Business, & Law

How undisclosed SEC investigations lead to insider trading

Should companies go public sooner about the fact that the SEC is investigating them? Daniel Taylor, a professor of accounting at Wharton, investigated this question in a research paper titled, “Undisclosed SEC Investigations,” which considers whether insiders gain an unfair advantage in being able to sell shares before the information hits the market.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Wharton 2020 MBAs earned an average of $150,000 salaries after graduation

Recently released statistics show that Wharton School alumni earn a median annual salary of $150,000 each.

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The Washington Post

Trump pushes new environmental rollbacks on way out the door

Cary Coglianese of the Law School said it’s not unusual for outgoing presidents to push for regulatory changes before the end of their term. “Regulations are not like diamonds,” he said. “They don’t last forever.”

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Education Week

What principals have learned from COVID-19’s ‘stress test’

The Consortium for Policy Research in Education, housed in the Graduate School of Education, has published five briefs about how U.S. school districts and principals have dealt with the pandemic. “The principals are doing all these amazing things, which are serving urgent needs of kids and families. That’s not taken into account in what we think of as a good school. There is an imbalance between our metrics for assessing quality and the actual role of schools in society,” said Jonathan Supovitz.

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Financial Times

Best books of 2020: Economics

“2030: How Today’s Biggest Trends Will Collide and Reshape the Future of Everything,” a book by Mauro Guillén of the Wharton School, was reviewed.

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ABC Australia

Trump self-pardon ‘cannot be ruled out’

Claire Finkelstein of the Law School spoke about challenges to the results of the presidential election and the possibility of President Donald Trump pardoning himself. “That would be an extremely interesting jurisprudential question because we’ve never had such a case,” she said.

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