Art History

She did it herself

The Penn Libraries exhibition “OK, I’ll Do It Myself” with selections from the collection of alumna Caroline Schimmel features 145 books, photographs, manuscripts, artwork, and memorabilia on women in the American wilderness, even Annie Oakley’s trunk.

Louisa Shepard

Cuba libre

The complexities of Cuba’s history and the response by artists were the focus of the summer abroad course “Penn-in-Havana: Visual Culture and Public Art in Cuba,” taught by art historian Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, and funded by a Making a Difference in Diverse Communities grant.

Louisa Shepard

Philadelphia and Meiji Japan symposium marks 150 years of deep ties

Scholars from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia, and the Meiji Jingu Intercultural Research Institute celebrate the 150th anniversary of Japan’s Meiji Restoration, and the surprising links between Philadelphia and Japan during a political period that set the island nation on a fast track to modernization.

Brandon Baker

A chance to be an art curator

In a creative approach to curating its next art exhibition, the Arthur Ross Gallery is opening the choice of artworks to the public through its first-ever crowdsourcing effort. 

Louisa Shepard

Stains Alive

For Libraries fellow Erin Connelly, stains are some of the most exciting discoveries in her study of medieval manuscripts. She is part of a national team analyzing stains in medieval texts using modern multispectral imaging. An exhibition at Van Pelt-Dietrich Library displays the researchers’ discoveries.

Louisa Shepard , Louisa Shepard

Monumental project rethinks public art in Philadelphia

As part of Monument Lab, a Philadelphia public art and history project, three PennDesign Fine Arts professors joined artists and residents to answer the question, ‘What makes a monument in the 21st century?’

Jacquie Posey



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Associated Press

The European Art Scene Began With Neanderthals

Harold Dibble of the School of Arts and Sciences weighs in on new studies claiming cave paintings and decorated seashells found in Spain must have been created by Neanderthals 20,000 years prior to the arrival of Homo sapiens in Europe.

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WHYY (Philadelphia)

The Montiers: An American Story

Gwnedolyn DuBois Shaw of the School of Arts and Sciences commented on the history of Philadelphia’s Montier family, who owned one of the earliest African-American homesteads and cemeteries in the U.S. (Video)

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