Criminology

Well water, lead, and the link to juvenile delinquency

Research from Penn and other universities found that, compared to children with municipal water, those relying on private wells in the U.S. had a 21% higher risk of being reported for any delinquency and a 38% increased risk of being reported for serious delinquency after age 14.

Michele W. Berger

The story of immigration enforcement

In an award-winning paper, criminologist Aaron Chalfin examines the public safety implications of labor market-based immigration enforcement.

From OMNIA

COVID-19, protests, and crime

During a summer internship with the Law School’s David Abrams, rising sophomores Caroline Li and David Feng looked at how the COVID-19 pandemic and last summer’s racial justice protests affected America’s crime rate. 

Kristen de Groot



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In the News


WESA Radio (Pittsburgh)

Fighting blight by fixing up homes could bring down Philly gun violence, new study shows

A co-authored Penn study found that restoring the areas around abandoned houses can lead to a drop in neighborhood gun crime.

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WHYY (Philadelphia)

Fighting blight by fixing up homes could bring down Philly gun violence, new study shows

A study by Eugenia South of the Perelman School of Medicine and John MacDonald of the School of Arts & Sciences and colleagues finds that restoring the areas around abandoned houses can lead to a drop in neighborhood gun crime.

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China Daily

Gun violence: A U.S. scourge that refuses to die

Richard Berk of the School of Arts & Sciences notes that many countries have disadvantaged people who are angry and alienated but don’t possess guns.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Renovating abandoned houses reduces the rate of gun violence, Penn study finds

A study by Eugenia C. South of the Perelman School of Medicine, John MacDonald of the School of Arts & Sciences and colleagues found that rates of gun violence were reduced in neighborhood blocks surrounding renovated homes.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Hundreds of Philly police officers work administrative jobs that could be done by civilians, a study found

A study by the Fels Institute of Government in the School of Arts & Sciences contends that “civilianizing” nearly 900 positions on the Philadelphia Police force could result in a more diverse, efficient, and productive department.

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Reuters

Laws restricting right to film police prove to be a waste of time

Seth Kreimer of Penn Carey Law is quoted on the accompaniment of cellphone camera technology by cases of police prosecuting critics who recorded them.

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