Health Sciences

U.S. Falls to 27th in Latest Report Card on World Social Progress; Chronic Poverty to Blame

PHILADELPHIA -- Cuts in social services and chronic poverty in U.S. cities and rural areas during the '90s have caused the U.S. to lag behind nearly all of Europe and several other countries in terms of overall social progress, according to the 2004 "Report Card on World Social Progress" by Richard Estes, a University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work professor.

Matt Gray

"At the Cutting Edge: The State of the Art Quilt " at the Arthur Ross Gallery

WHO: Philadelphia artists Cindy Friedman, Amy Orr, Leslie Pontz, Emily Richardson, Lonni Rossi and Deborah SchwartzmanWHAT: "At the Cutting Edge: The State of the Art Quilt" exhibitionWHERE: Arthur Ross Gallery, Furness Library Building, University of Pennsylvania, 220 S. 34th Street.WHEN: June 15 through July 28, 2002.

A Quarter-century of Community Partnerships

Glen Casey will be the first to admit it: He wasn’t the perfect student in high school. “I was always doing the dumbest things; getting into fights, getting arrested,” he says. A student then at University City High, Casey failed ninth grade, and barely passed 10th. “I just really wasn’t into school,” he says.



In the News


Science

Poor sleep could clog your arteries. A mouse study shows how that might happen

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Namni Goel weighed in on a new study that found that poor sleep can clog arteries.

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Men’s Health

Why gene editing may hold the promise of a herpes cure

Sita Awasthi of the Perelman School of Medicine discussed the challenges researchers face in pursuing a cure for herpes. In spite of advances in CRISPR technology, Awasthi emphasizes the continued need for a preventive vaccine.

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Reuters Health

Hospitals serving more minorities may offer less palliative care

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Kate Courtright commented on new findings that hospitals that primarily serve minorities provide their patients with less palliative care than other hospitals.

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The Wall Street Journal

How community health workers could create less-costly, higher-quality care

A study by Shreya Kangovi of the Perelman School of Medicine offered evidence that a comprehensive community health worker program, similar to those implemented in countries with shortages of doctors and nurses, could be effective in the U.S.

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Men’s Health

So, Meghan Markle is using a ‘doula’—What’s the deal with that?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Sindhu Srinivas commented on the increasing number of doulas employed by hospitals. Obstetricians “can’t be in the room the whole time, but doulas can, which can help women feel more supported,” said Srinivas.

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