Psychology



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Philadelphia Inquirer

Psychologist explains why we formed bad habits during quarantine, and tips for how to break them

Thea Gallagher of the Perelman School of Medicine was interviewed about anxiety and coping mechanisms amid the pandemic.

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The Washington Post

As movie theaters reopen, they’re tackling a role they never expected to play: psychologist

Deborah Small of the Wharton School said the primary way to make people comfortable adhering to COVID-19 safety practices is to see many others in their peer group taking the same steps. “The twist now,” she said, “is that we’re told to avoid crowds.”

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The New York Times

In a crisis, we can learn from trauma therapy

Karen Reivich of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about how to cultivate resilience in oneself. “There’s nothing magical about this work,” she said. “It’s hard work.”

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Time

How to soothe your ‘re-entry anxiety’ as COVID-19 lockdowns lift

Lily Brown of the Perelman School of Medicine said that people are experiencing two distinct types of re-entry anxiety as stay-at-home orders are lifted: the fear of unwittingly catching or spreading COVID-19 and general social anxiety associated with a lack of practice over the last few months.

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The Washington Post

A third of Americans now show signs of clinical anxiety or depression, Census Bureau finds amid coronavirus pandemic

Maria A. Oquendo of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the pandemic’s negative effects on Americans’ mental health. “It’s understandable given what’s happening. It would be strange if you didn’t feel anxious and depressed,” she said. “This virus is not like a hurricane or earthquake or even terrorist attack. It’s not something you can see or touch, and yet the fear of it is everywhere.”

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The New York Times

How to reduce your risk of PTSD in a post-COVID-19 world

Edna Foa of the Perelman School of Medicine recommended taking breaks to self-soothe amidst the COVID-19 crisis. “If you are obsessed with this pandemic, you need to find ways to distract yourself,” she said.

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