Campus & Community

Penn Commencement Live on the Web

PHILADELPHIA  Family and friends unable to attend Penn's 247th Commencement in person will be able to view the entire ceremony online thanks to a live Webcast. Coverage of the ceremony at Franklin Field  from processional to recessional and all the pomp and circumstance in between  will be broadcast live on the Internet beginning at 9 a.m. (EDT), Monday, May 19.

Jacquie Posey

Desmond Tutu to Speak at Penn Commencement

PHILADELPHIA -- Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel laureate and one of the world's foremost Christian leaders to oppose apartheid in South Africa, will deliver the address at the 247th Commencement ceremony of the University of Pennsylvania May 19.

Jacquie Posey

TV Journalist Jim Lehrer to Speak at Penn Commencement

PHILADELPHIA -- Jim Lehrer, one of the most respected television journalists in the United States and the host of "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer," will deliver the Commencement address at the 246th Commencement ceremony of the University of Pennsylvania Monday, May 13.

Ron Ozio

A Quarter-century of Community Partnerships

Glen Casey will be the first to admit it: He wasn’t the perfect student in high school. “I was always doing the dumbest things; getting into fights, getting arrested,” he says. A student then at University City High, Casey failed ninth grade, and barely passed 10th. “I just really wasn’t into school,” he says.

Office Hours party edition transcript

Duane: I have a fig tree that is called the mighty Georgian Pine and now the only reason that I have this tree is because my daughters were born in California and one of them seemed to have developed a allergy to a Christmas tree one year. So we went and got this ancient, this antique, tree called the mighty Georgian pine, as I said, and it takes hours to assemble.

Penn Today Staff



In the News


Philadelphia Inquirer

Philadelphia brings in tent hospitals and extra staff for the coming coronavirus surge

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Jeremy Cannon is leading the effort to prepare HUP for a surge of COVID-19 patients, with plans to convert the Quadrangle and part of Spruce Street into a field hospital. Meanwhile, more than a dozen Penn nurses, including Katherine Major, have volunteered to administer chemotherapy and other intravenous medications in patients’ homes.

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Penn to provide $4 million in emergency financial assistance to employees, contractors, small businesses

Penn will provide $4 million in emergency funding to support local workers affected by the coronavirus pandemic. “This is a crucial time for civic leadership,” President Amy Gutmann said.

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The Washington Post

Spring sport athletes can officially receive an extra year of eligibility after NCAA Division I Council vote

M. Grace Calhoun of Athletics commented on the NCAA Division I Council’s decision to grant all athletes participating in a spring sport an extra year of eligibility in response to the coronavirus pandemic. “The Council’s decision gives individual schools the flexibility to make decisions at a campus level,” she said. “The Board of Governors encouraged conferences and schools to take action in the best interest of student-athletes and their communities, and now schools have the opportunity to do that.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Wharton will fast track a course on managing business during a pandemic crisis

Mauro Guillén of the Wharton School spoke about the School’s new online course Epidemics, National Disasters, and Geopolitics: Managing Global Business and Financial Uncertainty. “We’re covering every topic we think is relevant from a business or economic perspective,” he said. “The virus has become a global pandemic because we’re such an interconnected society. We’ll be looking at every possible angle.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

‘It’s go time for spring’: Blossoms, buds, and temperatures are popping

Bill Cullina, executive director of the Morris Arboretum, talked about the transition from winter to spring. “I would say within the next couple of weeks it’s going to be safe to plant cold vegetables, things like onions and cabbage,” he said. “Get out there and enjoy it.”

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