Education, Business, & Law

When cash is tight, should you borrow from retirement?

While millions of Americans find themselves strapped for cash with reduced work or lost jobs, tapping retirement savings is fraught with risks that need careful consideration, according to experts at Wharton.

From Knowledge@Wharton

Making sense of coronavirus statistics

Wharton professor Adi Wyner digs into the statistics about the COVID-19 outbreak and offers insights into what the numbers mean.

From Wharton Stories



In the News


Bloomberg

Wharton’s Siegel sees inflation return, strong consumer spending in 2021

Jeremy Siegel of the Wharton School said 2020’s pandemic will lead to strong consumer spending in 2021. “This money in people’s accounts is going to be spent,” he said.

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Marketplace (NPR)

When immigrants come to the U.S., investments often follow

Zeke Hernandez of the Wharton School was interviewed about new restrictions on work visas and how those obstacles could negatively affect the U.S. economy. “Immigrants are a leading indicator of where capital will flow in the future,” he said.

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The New York Times

Mayor de Blasio, bring back summer jobs

Judd B. Kessler of the Wharton School co-authored an opinion piece in favor of New York City’s summer jobs programs, which Mayor Bill de Blasio canceled in April.

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Inside Higher Ed

Report: Focus funding on colleges best able to help unemployed

Joni Finney of the Graduate School of Education and colleagues wrote a report calling on U.S. governors to develop a long-term higher education strategy that stimulates the economy and restructures how colleges are funded.

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Forbes

Meet the forgotten woman who forever change date lives of LGBTQ+ workers

Serena Mayeri of the Law School and School of Arts & Sciences spoke about Pauli Murray’s effort to include “sex” in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. “There’s this pernicious myth that the sex amendment was some kind of joke, or fluke, or a poison pill that was designed to sink the Civil Rights Act,” Mayeri said, “when in fact it really was the product of the deliberate efforts by advocates for women.”

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