Anthropology

The story the bowls tell

In an ambitious new project, historian Simcha Gross and Harvard’s Rivka Elitzur-Leiman are studying hundreds of ancient incantation bowls housed at the Penn Museum. They hope to better understand the objects and eventually, build a database of all these bowls worldwide.

Michele W. Berger

From the page to the stage

In collaboration with author Amitav Ghosh, musician Ali Sethi, and Penn’s Brooke O’Harra, 14 students brought to life a parable Ghosh wrote about the world’s largest mangrove forest, human greed, and the environment.

Michele W. Berger

Keepers of the cultural memory

In wartime, saving human lives is a top priority. But secondary considerations often include preserving the cultural heritage also under siege. Penn experts offer their thoughts as the situation in Ukraine continues to unfold.

Michele W. Berger

Studying the past through a modern-day lens

In a Q & A, archaeologist and PIK Professor Lynn Meskell discusses her background, the subjects that interest her—from espionage to World Heritage sites—and collaborations that have organically arisen at Penn despite the pandemic and a mostly remote first year.

Michele W. Berger



Media Contact


In the News


ABC Australia

World Heritage—too much of a good thing?

PIK Professor Lynn Meskell, also of the Penn Museum, joins a radio conversation to discuss how the World Heritage Convention has become a victim of its own success.

FULL STORY →



Science News

Humans may have started tending animals almost 13,000 years ago

Naomi Miller of the School of Arts & Sciences says that a University of Connecticut study confirms that dung was used as fuel between 12,800 and 12,300 years ago.

FULL STORY →



Los Angeles Times

Wildfires have changed. Firefighting hasn’t

Adriana Petryna of the School of Arts & Sciences writes that risk factors for wildfires are setting the stage for disasters that our current tools are not always able to manage or suppress.

FULL STORY →



Discover Magazine

Don’t count on evolution to save us from toxic chemicals and pollution

PIK Professor Sarah Tishkoff spoke about how humans continue to evolve. For example, she said, a genetic variant that enables lactose tolerance didn’t emerge until somewhere between the past several hundred and 2,000 years. “When you’re talking about evolutionary time scales, that’s like a flash.”

FULL STORY →



Science

Africans begin to take the reins of research into their own genomes

PIK Professor Sarah Tishkoff spoke about her research sampling the genes of remote populations in various African regions. “Our studies combined are just the tip of the iceberg,” she said.

FULL STORY →



Science

Humans were drinking milk before they could digest it

PIK Professor Sarah Tishkoff spoke about the anthropological origins of dairy farming and consumption. “If you have cows, you have a source of liquid and proteins and nutrition,” she said. “As long as you can keep your cattle alive, of course.”

FULL STORY →