Veterinary Medicine

A tale of two surgeries at Penn Vet

Penn Vet is known for pioneering veterinary surgical procedures. Two recent, complex cases put that expertise on display, with joyful results.

Sacha Adorno

Penn Vet dual degrees: The student experience

The expansion of the dual degree program is timely, given the recent perfect storm of a pandemic; growing awareness of social, racial and economic inequity; and increased impact of climate change .

From Penn Vet



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In the News


WESA Radio (Pittsburgh)

More than 1,000 cases of mysterious bird disease reported in Pennsylvania

Scott Weber of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Penn’s Wildlife Futures Program said wildlife veterinarians are concerned about the numerous reports of sick or dead songbirds in the Mid-Atlantic region. “It does seem to be spreading through the U.S. pretty quickly, and spreading to a fairly wide geographical area,” he said.

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NPR

A mysterious illness is killing Mid-Atlantic songbirds

Lisa Murphy of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about the Wildlife Futures Program’s research on the illness killing songbirds in the Mid-Atlantic region. "I think what's especially challenging about this is that it's not localized ... to one specific geographic area [and] it's not localized to one particular bird species,” she said.

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U.S. News & World Report

‘Transmitted down the leash:’ Anxious owners, anxious dogs

James Serpell of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about the reciprocal relationship between pets’ and their owners’ feelings. “You can think of many contexts in which having an animal that can anticipate your thoughts is wonderful, in terms of training or performing tasks for people,” he said. “But in the context of an owner who's experiencing a lot of anxiety, you can see the disadvantage.”

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The New York Times

COVID-sniffing dogs are accurate but face hurdles for widespread use

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine said that before the U.S. deploys COVID-sniffing dogs on a large scale, clear training and performance standards need to be set.

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The New York Times

On the COVID front lines, when not getting belly rubs

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine said better research is needed to determine how effectively dogs can detect COVID by scent. Until then, using dogs to screen people could allow some cases to go undetected. “I don’t want to miss those, then everyone thinks they’re safe,” she said.

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The New York Times

Grumpy dogs outperform the friendlies on some learning tests

Cynthia Otto of the School of Veterinary Medicine spoke about dog personality traits. At Penn’s Working Dog Center, she said, “we allow dogs to choose their careers and it’s based on their personalities and on their interactions and on their relationships.”

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