Health Sciences

Regrowing dental tissue with stem cells from baby teeth

In a clinical trial led by Songtao Shi of the School of Dental Medicine, stem cells extracted from baby teeth were used to regrow the living tissue in teeth damaged by injury. The promising findings highlight the potential of dental stem cells, which could be used in a wide range of dental procedures, or treating certain systemic diseases.

Katherine Unger Baillie

Finding patterns in a class of neurological disorders

Research from Penn Engineering and the Perelman School of Medicine has found that the shared pattern is misfolded in Fragile X Syndrome, a member of the class of disorders that also includes ALS and Huntington’s disease

Penn Today Staff

Stigmatizing views and myths about psoriasis are pervasive

New multidisciplinary research involving both psychologists and dermatologists from the Perelman School of Medicine is the first to examine how common this stigma may be among the general population of the United States.

Penn Today Staff

An oasis of compassion

Since 2015, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania has supported the Family Caregiver Center, a three-room space that serves an array of needs, from resources to relaxation, for caregivers—one of only a few in the United States.

Brandon Baker



In the News


Science

What now for human genome editing?

The Perelman School of Medicine’s James Wilson discussed possible venues for the scientific oversight of controversial research. The FDA could be a good option, he suggested, but the organization would have to change its confidentiality restrictions to supervise effectively.

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Reader’s Digest

The 10 most common types of cancer in the United States

Thomas Karasic of the Perelman School of Medicine weighed in on treatments for liver and pancreatic cancers.

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Today

Died of a broken heart? The science behind close couple deaths

David Casarett of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the phenomenon of spouses dying shortly after one another. Casarett said social and cultural factors may play a role, as in cases when “the surviving spouses stop taking care of themselves. Sometimes they become depressed.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Black and Hispanic Americans have a harder time quitting cigarettes. Will this Penn study find a way to help?

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, led by Scott Halpern, are exploring better ways to support smoking cessation in black and Latino populations. “We’re confident that if we succeed in producing this evidence, health systems and payers will respond,” Halpern said.

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Smithsonian Magazine

What’s new, and what’s not, in the reported birth of the CRISPR babies

The Perelman School of Medicine’s Kiran Musunuru said that the birth of gene-edited babies does not constitute a scientific advancement because “there was nothing preventing previous researchers who edited human embryos from doing the same, except their own ethics and morals.”

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