Health Sciences

To boost opioid treatment prescriptions, entice physicians

A new study shows that a financial incentive can dramatically increase the number of emergency department physicians trained to prescribe a potentially life-saving medication that prevents patients from fatal opioid overdose.

Penn Medicine

Oral care during COVID-19

Experts from the School of Dental Medicine share tips on how to maintain healthy teeth and gums even when a trip to the dentist isn’t in the cards for the time being and what to expect as restrictions are lifted.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


The New York Times

Five-minute coronavirus stress resets

Research by Veena Graff of the Perelman School of Medicine found that serene music can be highly effective in decreasing preoperative anxiety in patients.

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The New York Times

Health experts to F.D.A: Make your vaccine deliberations public

Paul Offit of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about the FDA’s emergency authorization of hydroxychloroquine as a COVID-19 treatment, despite a lack of evidence of its efficacy. “I think the administration bent or imposed its will on the F.D.A.,” he said. “There’s a concern that this would happen [with the vaccine], too.”

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The New York Times

Scientists uncover biological signatures of the worst COVID-19 cases

John Wherry of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about his research on the distinct immune signatures of severe COVID-19 infections, which can cause the typical immune response to go awry.

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The New York Times

‘Like a horror movie’: A small border hospital battles the coronavirus

Genevieve Kanter of the Perelman School of Medicine spoke about a study she co-authored that warned of disparities in access to critical care facilities amid the pandemic. “Unfortunately, there will be a lot of unnecessary suffering and deaths from COVID-19 because of the lack of I.C.U. capacity in these low-income areas,” she said.

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The New York Times

Contact tracing is failing in many states. Here’s why

Carolyn Cannuscio of the Perelman School of Medicine says contact tracing is broken due to larger failures in the prevention system. “We have to start by supporting people in getting tested, which means making it easy enough for those exposed to someone or has symptoms to just show up and not worry about a doctor’s order,” she said.

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