Jill DiSanto

Jill DiSanto

News Officer

Jill DiSanto manages media relations efforts for the School of Social Policy & Practice; the Field Center for Children’s Policy, Practice & Research; and the Netter Center for Community Partnerships. Her beats also include Naval ROTC battalion, the African-American Resource Center, history, political science, College Houses (dorms), the Division of Public Safety, and the Office of Government & Community Affairs. Her student feature stories showcase the Center for Undergraduate Research, community engagement activities, and the experience of students who identify as first-generation, low-income, or FGLI.  

A Marshall Scholarship for Penn

A 2017 graduate of the Wharton School, Theodore Caputi has won a prestigious Marshall Scholarship to study at any university in the United Kingdom.

Jill DiSanto , Amanda Mott

Penn’s Public Safety ranks #1

For the 12th consecutive year, the Division of Public Safety took the top spot in the higher-education sector of Security magazine’s “Security 500.”

Jill DiSanto

A Rhodes for Penn

Penn senior Anea Moore has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for graduate study at the University of Oxford. Considered one of the most prestigious academic honors, the Rhodes is highly competitive. 

Jill DiSanto

Celebrating 30 years with Stimulus Children’s Theatre

The campus theater group focused on entertaining children marked its 30th anniversary with performances during Homecoming Weekend, along with an alumni gala at the Platt Student Performing Arts House.

Jill DiSanto

Showcasing veteran voices

After regularly searching through campus events, sophomore James “J.D.” Goins says he had a difficult time finding activities that showcased veteran voices. To change that, he is launching a series of campus conversations, bringing veterans who are now involved in business, politics, and other industries to Penn to share their insights on success.

Jill DiSanto

Perspective: 100 years since the armistice that ended WWI

Nov. 11 is the centennial of the end of World War I, “the war to end all wars.” Historians Arthur Waldron and Frederick Dickinson provide perspectives on the conclusion of that horrifically deadly conflict.

Jill DiSanto