Positive Psychology

What beliefs shape our minds?

Jer Clifton of the Positive Psychology Center developed a framework to study primal world beliefs, our most fundamental sentiments about the world as a whole. Now, he’s ready for everyone to discover what their primal world beliefs are.

Marilyn Perkins

How a brain tumor helped a cyclist change his life

In 2019, Chris Baccash was diagnosed with a a slow-growing malignant brain tumor. In 2021, after completing a grueling 100-mile cycling race up the Rockies, he started graduate school at Penn for a master’s degree in positive psychology.

From Penn Medicine News



In the News


Forbes

Stressed by work? You can tap your own resilience

Martin Seligman of the School of Arts & Sciences discusses his new co-authored book, “TOMORROWMIND,” which shows how people can meet future challenges while thriving in the workplace.

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Psychology Today

Moral virtues and character strengths across the life span

Martin Seligman of the School of Arts & Sciences is lauded for convening a 2005 meeting at Penn of the world’s leading experts in the emerging field of positive psychology.

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Time

How to manage catastrophic thinking

A study of soldiers by Martin Seligman of the School of Arts & Sciences found a correlation between catastrophizing and greater risk of PTSD.

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Forbes

Art museum visitors must experience positive and negative emotions to work toward empathy

A study by Katherine N. Cotter and James O. Pawelski of the School of Arts & Sciences suggests that the wellbeing of art museum visitors should receive greater attention as a goal.

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CNN

Wharton professor on how to really achieve your goals

Katy Milkman of the Wharton School discusses her book “How to Change,” which offers science-backed tips to turn New Year’s resolutions into reality.

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CNET

Three minutes a day can boost your happiness

A quoted study from Martin Seligman of the School of Arts & Sciences found that writing down three good things that happened at the end of each day led to long-term increases in happiness and decreases in depressive symptoms.

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