Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Around the world in 1,082 days

A Q&A with historian Antonio Feros reflecting on the 500th anniversary of Ferdinand Magellan’s circumnavigation of the globe, and how the voyage shaped both the 16th century and today.

Erica K. Brockmeier

Minds in the wild

As part of a MindCORE effort to bring research into the community, behavioral psychologist Elizabeth Brannon and her team spent the summer conducting two studies at the Academy of Natural Sciences to better understand how children learn.

Michele W. Berger

Slower growth in working memory linked to teen driving crashes

Adolescent drivers have the highest rate of vehicle crashes. Variability in working memory development might be a factor, and researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center tested the association between crashes and differential working memory development.

Penn Today Staff

Pairing science with ethics to save lives

Penn President Amy Gutmann and Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor Jonathan Moreno discussed their new book “Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven But Nobody Wants to Die” at a Free Library of Philadelphia book talk Monday.

Lauren Hertzler

Cell-mostly internet users place privacy burden on themselves

A new report from the Media, Inequality and Change (MIC) Center details the kinds of online privacy tradeoffs that disproportionately impact cell-mostly internet users—who are likely to be Black, Hispanic, and/or low-income.

Penn Today Staff

Americans’ civics knowledge increases but still has a long way to go

The past few years have seen contention between Congress and the president over budgets and immigration, disputes over the limits of executive power, contested confirmation hearings for two Supreme Court justices, and lawsuits involving members of Congress and the president.

Penn Today Staff

Dissecting the Green New Deal

During what’s likely the largest climate event ever held at Penn, leaders in a range of fields discussed the practicalities and implications of the resolution introduced into Congress in February aimed at stemming climate change.

Michele W. Berger



In the News


WHYY (Philadelphia)

After ‘long-term extended loan,’ Penn Museum sends ancient Iraqi artifacts home

The Penn Museum is bringing 3 boxes of ancient artifacts to the Iraq embassy in Washington, D.C. to be returned to their country of origin. “All the tablets were shipped out to be studied because no one in Iraq at the time could read them,” said the Museum’s Brad Hafford.

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Forward.com

The Trump Administration is using accusations of anti-Semitism to silence criticism of Israel

Ian Lustick of the School of Arts and Sciences wrote an opinion piece about the current administration’s efforts to “chill free speech and criticism of Israel” using the Department of Education’s civil rights mandate.

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“The Brian Lehrer Show,” WNYC Radio (New York City)

America, are we ready: Democracy and impeachment and inclusion

Mary Frances Berry of the School of Arts and Sciences spoke on a podcast about the role of impeachment in American democracy.

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Science

French playwright Molière did indeed write his own masterpieces, computer science suggests

Joan DeJean of the School of Arts and Sciences said the 17th-century French playwright Molière has a uniquely identifiable authorial voice.

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The New York Times

Make room at the table for difficult people

Annette Lareau of the School of Arts and Sciences wrote an op-ed about how families can make space for everyone at the Thanksgiving table, including those with mental illnesses and cognitive disabilities. “The trick is to reframe our expectations and accept the situation for what it is,” she said.

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