Sociology

‘Disease knows no borders’

From the history of science to medical anthropology, governance, and economics, Penn experts look at the history of global health from different perspectives to see what the future may hold.

Kristina García

Less and later marriage in South Korea

Sociologist Hyunjoon Park sheds light on why marriage rates are falling in South Korea, particularly among highly educated women and low-educated men.

Penn Today Staff

The Amish and the Anthropocene

Nicole Welk-Joerger, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History and Sociology of Science, discusses what a technology adopted by the Amish can tell us about climate change and the future.

Penn Today Staff



Media Contact


In the News


Associated Press

US births fall, and virus could drive them down more

Hans-Peter Kohler of the School of Arts & Sciences commented on the possibility of a further decline in birth rates due to the coronavirus. The question isn’t whether or not there will be decline, but rather if the decline will be lasting, he said.

FULL STORY →



Philadelphia Inquirer

Wisconsin judge’s ‘regular folks’ remark shows how pandemic exposes classism

Annette Lareau of the School of Arts & Sciences spoke about the lack of contact between Americans from upper and lower classes. “There are few spaces where people of different classes encounter each other,” she said. “IKEA, the zoo, July Fourth parades. But increasingly, people stay within their own worlds. That helps them treat others with contempt and shame.”

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

Trump hasn’t given up on divide and conquer

Daniel Hopkins of the School of Arts & Sciences and alumna Samantha Washington were cited for their research about changes in white Americans’ views on race during the last few years.

FULL STORY →



FiveThirtyEight

Why the Democrats have shifted left over the last 30 years

Dan Hopkins of the School of Arts and Sciences was cited for his research, which found that racial prejudice in white Americans has decreased since 2007, particularly among Democrats.

FULL STORY →



Popular Science

Why a decline in U.S. birth rates could actually help our economy

Hans-Peter Kohler of the School of Arts and Sciences explained falling birth rates, saying, “There is a broader transformation in young adulthood where there is an increasing prominence in education, career building, human capital, and so forth so that children tend to be desired later in life.”

FULL STORY →



The Wall Street Journal

A white woman searches for her black family

Wendy Roth of the School of Arts and Sciences said consumer DNA tests rely on information based on migration patterns from thousands of years ago, even though borders have changed significantly. “The tests present it as if it determines who you are today,” she said.

FULL STORY →