Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

A life of writing and song

Rosanne Cash, a Kelly Writers House Fellow, was on campus for a course taught by English Professor Al Filreis that focuses on three eminent writers each spring semester.  

Louisa Shepard

How superstitions spread

Superstitious beliefs may seem irrational, but they catch on in a society. Using an evolutionary approach to studying the emergence of coordinated behaviors, Erol Akçay and Bryce Morsky showed how a jumble of individual beliefs, including superstitions, coalesce into an accepted social norm.

Katherine Unger Baillie



In the News


NPR

Understanding Kashmir

Suvir Kaul of the School of Arts and Sciences talks about political conflict between Indian and Pakistan. “I’m watching this [Indian] government doing all it can to change that kind of unitary sense of the nation and that’s what worries me enormously,” said Kaul.

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The Washington Post

Is a recession looming? Here’s what experts on the economy are watching

Ioana Marinescu of the School of Social Policy & Practice weighed in on the possibility of a recession in the near future. “I expect a recession any day now, because it’s been almost 12 years since the last trough,” she said. “However, it’s impossible to predict with high accuracy when it will happen since recessions are often precipitated by market panics coalescing around a particular event that is usually hard to anticipate.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

American flags in Hong Kong show people still fight for our values. Americans should join them

Carolyn Marvin of the Annenberg School for Communication spoke about the relationship between Chinese protestors and American symbolism. The U.S. flag, she said, “represents democracy and—on a good day—it represents human rights.”

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USA Today

Motels as homeless shelters? More local governments are housing people in motel rooms

Dennis Culhane of the School of Social Policy & Practice discussed the advantages of repurposing old motels as shelters for people experiencing homelessness. “First of all, it’s built, so there’s no acquiring property and going through the process of getting architectural drawings and building something from scratch,” he said. “You have an asset that you can basically just polish up and improve.”

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Philadelphia Inquirer

Each night, Philly jails release scores of inmates without returning their IDs, cash or phones

Ruth Shefner of the School of Social Policy & Practice commented on the release of incarcerated people without regard to the time of day and its effect on the people being released.

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