Education, Business, & Law

If pandemic productivity is up, why is innovation slowing down?

A new study finds that productivity has remained stable or even increased for many companies that shifted to remote work during the coronavirus pandemic. However, innovation has taken a hit as both leaders and employees feel more distant from each other.

From Knowledge@Wharton

Breaking classroom barriers over Zoom

When Professor Lori Rosenkopf’s course on the culture of tech went virtual, she set out to make a more interactive learning experience. Her efforts have seen some unexpected results.

From Wharton Stories

Law students spearhead pro bono projects for pandemic relief

From connecting small businesses with loans to helping Philadelphians navigate unemployment and housing insecurity, students at the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School are working to get people the help they need.

From Penn Law

A role model for the changing face of science

Jennifer Stimpson, a chemist, teacher, and recent alumna of the Graduate School of Education’s mid-career program, was named an IF/THEN ambassador. The initiative aims to empower women in STEM to inspire the next generation of learners.

Michele W. Berger



In the News


WHYY (Philadelphia)

‘I don’t know where to move’: Philly immigrants who’ve lived through coups warn of the rise of fringe groups

Bulent Gultekin of the Wharton School said that compared to the coup he witnessed in Turkey 60 years ago, the recent attack on the U.S. Capitol was more like a “mob scene” than a coup. “It doesn’t mean that things will be the same or we’ll forget about this very quickly, it’s a very important lesson,” he said. “In a country where it’s divided and so many are polarized, this is always a problem in the long run.”

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NBC News

Democrats have a new tool to undo Trump's 'midnight rule-making.' But there's a catch

Cary Coglianese of the Law School spoke about the seldom-used Congressional Review Act, which allows Congress to overturn federal rules with a simple majority and prohibit federal agencies from reissuing similar rules without their approval. “If there’s a type of rule that the incoming administration would really like to ensure never gets adopted again, the CRA is a good way to do that,” Coglianese said.

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The Hill

Parler sues Amazon, asks court to reinstate platform

David Hoffman of the Law School said Parler’s lawsuit against Amazon has been weakened because Amazon had warned the social media platform about violating the terms of their agreement prior to terminating the account. “There have been repeated warnings over time about Parler’s failure to comply with Amazon’s terms of use,” Hoffman said. “Given those repeated warnings over time, it’s sort of rich to say, ‘You didn’t give us enough time.’”

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CBS Philadelphia

Philadelphia police increases presence in parts of city again following storming of US Capitol

Claire Finkelstein of the Law School said President Trump may have committed a crime by encouraging his supporters to breach the U.S. Capitol building. “The question is whether or not the president was intentionally trying to interfere with the peaceful transition of power and trying to launch an attack using his supporters as weapons against the U.S. government,” Finkelstein said. “If we were to find out additional facts that suggested some intentionality on the part of the president, then I believe he could be guilty of sedition.”

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Associated Press

8 Pa. House GOP members to oppose Biden’s electoral votes

Seth Kreimer of the Law School spoke about challenges to the results of the 2020 presidential election. “I have taught constitutional law for almost four decades, and I do not believe I have ever before seen American officials reject the outcome of an election with such brazenness,” he said.

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