Education, Business, & Law

Nostalgia is not enough: Why consumers abandon legacy brands

Legacy brands like Sears, Payless ShoeSource, and Toys “R” Us are shuttering their doors as customers abandon longstanding consumer mainstays. Despite customers having emotional connections to certain stores, “It is more like these brands are breaking up with the customers,” says Santiago Gallino of the Wharton School.

Penn Today Staff

Who made that decision: You or an algorithm?

Wharton’s Kartik Hosanagar’s new book, “A Human’s Guide to Machine Intelligence: How Algorithms Are Shaping Our Lives and How We Can Stay in Control,” examines how algorithms influence our decisions.

Penn Today Staff

U.S. debt: Is it the calm before the storm?

The U.S. national debt has crossed $22 trillion. Wharton’s Kent Smetters and Joao Gomes discuss the nation’s long-term debt burden and what might be done about it.

Penn Today Staff

The math behind March Madness

A Q&A with statistician Shane Jensen, who discusses the math behind sports team rankings, why March Madness has so many underdog victories, and how technology might change how analysts study sports teams in the future.

Erica K. Brockmeier



In the News


The New York Times

Apple’s watch is smarter, but my Casio keeps getting the job done

Commenting on the Apple Watch and the Casio, Daniel A. Levinthal of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, said, “Given a choice, most companies would rather be in the position of Apple, which has been innovating and successfully developing new products and bringing them to market and getting consumers to buy them than in the position of Casio, which has been much less successful at that, even if it is selling some fine products.”

FULL STORY →



Diverse Issues in Higher Education

Penn’s Grad School of Education cultivates a pipeline

To prepare teachers and educators for diverse environments, the Graduate School of Education is building pipelines for future students. “Penn’s location in the heart of West Philadelphia [presents] a great opportunity to think about what a graduate school of education could do in the context of an urban area,” said Dean Pam Grossman.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

Without bees, we are in trouble

Marvin Lazerson of the Graduate School of Education wrote about the importance of bees to the ecosystem. “Efforts like the Save the Bees movement have shown promise in bringing people together in pursuit of common goals,” he said.

FULL STORY →



The New York Times

Welcome to the promoconomy

Joseph Turow of the Annenberg School for Communication and David Bell of the Wharton School spoke about the use of retail promotions to acquire customer data.

FULL STORY →



Bloomberg

CEOs spurn investor-first model. Now critics ask ‘what’s next?’

Larry Hamermesh of the Law School rebutted claims that companies are legally required to prioritize shareholder returns. “The most frustrating thing I ever hear is when someone says that a board of directors can’t do things that are attuned to sustainability under the current legal system,” he said. “They can. There is nothing in the law that precludes this.”

FULL STORY →