Education, Business, & Law

Will Amazon’s plan to ‘upskill’ its employees pay off?

Wharton’s Matthew Bidwell discusses Amazon’s $700 million plan to retrain its workforce with “pathways to careers” in machine learning, manufacturing, robotics, and computer science, while facing mounting personnel and safety issues and concerns at its warehouses.

Penn Today Staff

Uncovering bias: A new way to study hiring can help

Research has shown how easy it is for an employer’s conscious and unconscious biases to creep in when reviewing resumés, creating an uneven playing field that disproportionally hurts women and minority job candidates.

Penn Today Staff

Is Huawei a national security threat?

Christopher Yoo, professor of law, communication, and computer and information science, describes why the Chinese technology company has become a hot topic of conversation in national security circles.

Brandon Baker

Why are U.S. hospitals closing?

Wharton’s Lawton Burns discusses the closure of Philadelphia’s Hahnemann University Hospital and the trend of medical facilities shuttering nationwide.

Penn Today Staff

The ACA battle is heating up

The Affordable Care Act is once again under threat, along with health insurance coverage for at least 20 million Americans, as a federal appeals court weighs on its constitutionality.

Penn Today Staff

How states can help police mortgage-lending practices

Wharton’s Brian Feinstein discusses his research on how judicial foreclosure can help states fill the policy gap left by the federal government’s pullback from regulatory enforcement of mortgage-lending.

Penn Today Staff

The role of UN ambassador, explained

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, distinguished global leader-in-residence at Perry World House, describes the workings of the U.S. ambassador to the U.N.—and whether it matters that it’s no longer of cabinet status.

Brandon Baker



In the News


The Washington Post

The GAO told the government in 2015 to develop a plan to protect the aviation system against an outbreak. It never happened

Howard Kunreuther of the Wharton School said good leadership is critical in preparing government agencies for catastrophic events. “You cannot deal with this at the level of just saying let each agency operate,” he said. “You need to have some way to bring them together and to indicate that this is a problem, which cannot be solved by one agency alone. That is something that leadership is going to have to suggest—‘This is the way to do it’—and we don’t have that right now.”

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Will coronavirus close your college for good?

Robert Zemsky of the Graduate School of Education spoke about the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on the financial health of higher education.

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Reuters

Delivery drivers face pandemic without sick pay, insurance, sanitizer

Matthew Bidwell of the Wharton School spoke about the pandemic-related changes to working conditions for contract employees. “It’s very sad because three weeks ago we were in a historically tight labor market,” he said. “It was forcing employers for the first time in a long time to offer more perks and more benefits. They no longer have that pressure.”

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The New York Times

Businesses face a new coronavirus threat: Shrinking access to credit

Krista Schwarz of the Wharton School spoke about how businesses are coping with the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic. “Everyone is just trying to get by day to day at the moment,” she said. “Right now is not the time to grow the company—it’s the time to stay solvent.”

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The New York Times

A conservative agenda unleashed on the federal courts

Stephen Burbank of the Law School spoke about trend by recent presidents to draw the federal judiciary into policy debates. “The problem as I see it is not that judges differ ideologically—of course they do—nor is it that a Republican president would look for someone with congenial ideological preferences,” he said. “It’s that in recent decades the search has been for hard-wired ideologues because they’re reliable policy agents.”

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